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3 Documents

Qualitative Data Analysis Software

Criteria for coding:

  1. When timelines are given, the proportion of time spent on each element is calculated.

  2. When grading percentages are specified,

Preparation of documents

  1. All institution and instructor policy information is excluded.  This would include (disability, dates of final exams, policies for absences, academic dishonesty, office hours) student instructions, housekeeping info

  2. Information included:  grade distributions, texts required

Abilene Christian University

www.acu.edu/music  website

http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2007_08/departments/cas/music.html  degree plans

http://www.acu.edu/catalog/2007_08/courses/must.html  courses

Req theory course

Title

Credit hours

Description

 

MUST 111

Elementary Theory: Sight Singing and Ear Training

1

MUST 111 Elementary Theory: Sight Singing and Ear Training (1-1-1), fall. Singing in treble, bass, alto, and tenor clefs; major and minor modes, elementary melodic and harmonic diction. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in MUST 131.

 

MUST 112

Elementary Theory: Sight Singing and Ear Training

1

MUST 112 Elementary Theory: Sight Singing and Ear Training (1-1-1), spring. Prerequisites: MUST 111, 131; concurrent enrollment in MUST 132.

 

MUST 131

Elementary Theory II: Analysis and Keyboard

3

MUST 131 Elementary Theory I: Analysis and Keyboard (3-0-3), fall. Introduction to analysis, part-writing, figured bass realization, and harmonization using diatonic harmony. Prerequisite: A Music Entrance Exam score of greater than 40 percent or satisfactory completion of MUST 120. Concurrent enrollment in MUST 111 required.

 

MUST 132

Elementary Theory II: Analysis and Keyboard

3

MUST 132 Elementary Theory II: Analysis and Keyboard (3-0-3), spring. Continuation of analysis, part writing, figured bass realization and harmonization covering the harmonic vocabulary of 18th century music including diatonic chords, secondary dominants, and modulation. Prerequisites: MUST 111, 131; concurrent enrollment in MUST 112.

 

MUST 211

Advanced Theory: Sight Singing and Ear Training

1

MUST 211 Advanced Theory: Sight Singing and Ear Training (1-1-1), fall. Includes chromaticism and modulations to closely related keys. Prerequisites: MUST 112, 132.

 

MUST 212

Advanced Theory: Sight Singing and Ear Training

1

MUST 212 Advanced Theory: Sight Singing and Ear Training (1-1-1), spring. Continuation of MUST 211 with modulations to all keys. Emphasis on development of improvisational skills. Prerequisite: MUST 211.

 

MUST 231

Advanced Theory I: Analysis and Keyboard

3

MUST 231 Advanced Theory I: Analysis and Keyboard (3-0-3), fall. Analysis, part-writing, and figured bass realization and harmonization covering the extended harmonic vocabulary of the nineteenth century including modulation, altered chords, chromatic harmony, and modes. Prerequisites: MUST 112, 132; concurrent enrollment in MUST 211 required.

 

MUST 232

Advanced Theory II: Analysis and Keyboard

3

MUST 232 Advanced Music Theory II: Analysis and Keyboard (3-0-3), spring. Literature, analysis and theoretical concepts of music since 1900. Emphasis will be placed on computer applications in music. This course satisfies the computer literacy requirements for music majors seeking teacher certification. Prerequisite: MUST 231; concurrent enrollment in MUST 212 required

 

MUST 332

Forms and Analysis

2

MUST 332 Forms and Analysis (2-0-2), spring. An analytical study of selected compositions from the late 17th through the early 20th centuries. Prerequisite: MUST 232.

 

MUST 432

Orchestration and Arranging

2

MUST 432 Orchestration and Arranging (2-0-2), fall. Ranges, transpositions, timbres, and individual characteristics of band and orchestra instruments, with experience in scoring for small ensembles, full band, and orchestra. Prerequisites: 12 hours of music including MUST 231, 232, or by permission.

 
  

0

MUST 120 Music Fundamentals (2-0-2), fall. A review of the fundamentals of music including clefs, key signatures, time signatures, and notation. Designed to prepare students for the music theory sequence.

 
 

Total

20

  

Angelo State University

www.angelo.edu/dept/artmusic  website

http://www.angelo.edu/dept/artmusic/music_maj_all_level.html  degree plans

http://www.angelo.edu/dept/artmusic/courses_in_music.html  courses

Music 1451, 1452, 2343, 2344, 2451, 2452 = 22 hours
Music 3163, 3164, 3251, 3252, 3263, 3264, 3341, 3342, 4281, 4282, 4253 = 22 hours

Don't know exactly how many credit hours for all courses.

Req theory course

Title

Credit hours

Description

 

MUS 1361

Fundamentals of Music

0

1361 Fundamentals of Music (3-0). This course is concerned with elementary musical materials and is designed for non-music majors. However, entry-level music majors may take the course to gain a working knowledge of music fundamentals, but it does not meet requirements for the music major.

 

MUS 1451

Comprehensive Musicianship I

4

1451 Comprehensive Musicianship I (3-2). A study of music fundamentals followed by a stylistic approach to the diatonic harmony of the 17th and 18th centuries. Training in sight-singing and ear-training of rhythms, intervals, scales, melodies, and harmony parallels written assignments.
Prerequisite for 1451: Successful completion of freshman theory placement examination.

 

MUS 1452

Comprehensive Musicianship I

4

1452 Comprehensive Musicianship I (3-2). A study of music fundamentals followed by a stylistic approach to the diatonic harmony of the 17th and 18th centuries. Training in sight-singing and ear-training of rhythms, intervals, scales, melodies, and harmony parallels written assignments.
Prerequisite for 1452: Successful completion of 1451.

 

MUS 2451

Comprehensive Musicianship II

4

2451 Comprehensive Musicianship II (3-2). A study of the harmonic and melodic techniques of the 19th and 20th centuries with emphasis on the changes in musical style from romanticism to the present time. Training in ear training and sight singing skills is coordinated with the study of harmony.
Prerequisite for 2451: successful completion of freshman theory.

 

MUS 2452

Comprehensive Musicianship II

4

2452 Comprehensive Musicianship II (3-2). A study of the harmonic and melodic techniques of the 19th and 20th centuries with emphasis on the changes in musical style from romanticism to the present time. Training in ear training and sight singing skills is coordinated with the study of harmony.
Prerequisite for 2451: successful completion of freshman theory.

 

MUS 3251

Analytic Techniques

2

3251 Analytic Techniques (0-3). A study of methods of analysis currently being applied to music of all periods. Students will learn to approach a piece of music with tools for understanding the work as a whole and the relationship of its parts.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of sophomore evaluation.

 

MUS 3252

Counterpoint

2

3252 Counterpoint (0-3). An introduction to the contrapuntal techniques of the sixteenth, eighteenth, and twentieth centuries, based primarily on learning to write in these styles. The class will include in-class performance of contrapuntal music being studied.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of sophomore evaluation.

 

MUS 4253

Orchestration

2

4253 Orchestration (0-3). A study of the capabilities of voices and all orchestral and wind ensemble instruments, including arranging and transcribing music for vocal and instrumental ensembles. This course includes a lab portion with hands-on experience.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of sophomore evaluation.

 
 

Total

22  

Baylor University

http://www.baylor.edu/music/  website

http://www.baylor.edu/content/services/document.php/70570.pdf  degree plans

http://www.baylor.edu/music/theory/index.php?id=48165  courses

Required theory courses for Music Ed majors:  Theory I, II, III, IV, V, (all 3 hours) Musicianship I, II, III, IV (all 1hours)

Introductory courses do not count towards degree.  total hours required = 19

Req theory course

Title

Credit hours

Description

 

MUS 1100

Introductory Musicianship

0

The aural skills complement to MUS 1200; emphasizes rudimentary skills in sight singing, rhythm reading, and ear training. Prerequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in MUS 1200 or 1301, or a passing score on the Theory Placement Exam, or divisional consent.

II. MUS 1100 Introductory Musicianship

             MUS 1100 is designed as the aural complement to MUS 1200 and emphasizes rudimentary skills in sight singing, rhythm reading, and ear training.

This course will enable students to:

  • match pitch
  • sing and identify any melodic interval, P1 through P8, ascending or descending
  • distinguish aurally between different forms of major and minor scales
  • recognize basic melodic figures—runs, neighbor figures, arpeggios
  • take melodic and rhythmic dictation of examples up to 15 notes long
  • read rhythms and sing melodies at sight
  • distinguish aurally between major and minor triads

 

 

MUS 1101

Musicianship I

1

The aural skills complement to MUS 1301, this course emphasizes solfège singing of major and minor melodies at sight, rhythm reading in both simple and compound meters, and melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation. Prerequisite(s): MUS 1100 or a passing score on the aural portion of the Theory Placement Exam; and credit or concurrent enrollment in MUS 1301.

IV. MUS 1101 Musicianship I

             MUS 1101 is the aural skills complement to MUS 1301.  This course emphasizes solfège singing of major and minor melodies at sight; rhythm reading in both simple and compound meters; melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation; and error detection.

 

This course will enable students to:

  • conduct basic meter patterns
  • sing and aurally identify any melodic interval within the octave, ascending or descending
  • sing and aurally identify scale degrees in any order in any major or minor key
  • recognize basic melodic figures and their placement in the scale
  • sight-sing non-modulating melodies in major and minor keys using solfège syllables (movable-do, do-minor)
  • perform while conducting rhythms in simple and compound meter, including elementary subdivisions of the beat  (both prepared and at-sight, with rhythm syllables)
  • perform two-part rhythm examples by tapping both parts and by vocalizing one part while tapping the other
  • take rhythmic dictation in simple and compound meter, including examples that contain divisions of the beat
  • take melodic dictation of non-modulating, diatonic melodies up to 20 notes long
  • sing (arpeggiate) and aurally distinguish various triad qualities and inversions
  • take harmonic dictation (bass, melody and chords) including all diatonic triads in root position and first inversion
  • take dictation of 1:1 two-part examples
 

MUS 1102

Musicianship II

1

A continuation of MUS 1101, designed as the aural skills complement to MUS 1302. Prerequisite(s): A minimum grade of C in MUS 1101, and either credit or concurrent enrollment in MUS 1302.

VI. MUS 1102 Musicianship II

            MUS 1102 is a continuation of MUS 1101 and is designed to be the aural skills complement to MUS 1302.

 

This course will enable students to:

  • aurally recognize any harmonic interval within the octave
  • sing in any order and identify in any register scale degrees in any major or minor key
  • take melodic dictation of non-modulating melodies up to 30 notes in length,  including 7th-chord arpeggiations
  • sing melodies including 7th-chord arpeggiations using solfège syllables
  • perform while conducting rhythms in simple and compound meters, including subdivisions, triplets, duplets, and syncopation, using rhythmic syllables (both prepared and at-sight examples)
  • take rhythmic dictation and error detection in simple and compound meters, including features listed above
  • perform two-part rhythm examples by tapping both parts and by reading one part while tapping the other
  • sing (arpeggiate) and aurally identify root position seventh chords in isolation
  • take harmonic dictation (bass, melody and chords) of progressions including all diatonic triads and seventh chords in all inversion and including non-chord tones
  • take dictation of two-voiced 2:1 contrapuntal examples
  • take dictation and analyze phrase structure of non-chorale excerpts from the literature

 

 

 

MUS 1200

Introductory Music Theory

0

The study of rudiments of written theory, including notation, scales, key signatures, music terminology, intervals, rhythm and meter, chord construction, and music reading. Does not count as credit toward a degree with a major in music.

I. MUS 1200 Introductory Theory

            MUS 1200 is the study of the rudiments of written theory, including notation, scales, key signatures, music terminology, intervals, rhythm and meter, chord construction, and music reading.  This course does not count for credit toward a degree with a major in music.

 

This course will enable students to understand the following concepts:

  • pitch notation—staff, clefs, ledger lines, accidentals, enharmonic pitches,

octave registers

  • rhythm and meter—note and rest values, the beat and its division, meter

types, metronome and tempo indications, time signatures, beaming, meter

identification

  • major and minor scales

  • key signatures

  • intervals

  • major and minor triads

 

MUS 1301

Theory I

3

The first course in a systematic study of the organization of music of the Common Practice Period. Students acquire a basic understanding of the structure of tonal music through analysis and written exercises in harmony and counterpoint. Prerequisite(s): MUS 1200, or a passing score on the Music Theory Placement Exam.

III. MUS 1301 Theory I

             MUS 1301 is the first course in a systematic study of the organization of music of the Common Practice Period.  Students acquire a basic understanding of the structure of tonal music through analysis and written exercises in harmony and counterpoint.

 

This course will enable students to:

  • build speed and confidence in writing and identifying intervals, scales, key signatures, and triads through timed drills
  • write and identify any triad or seventh chord by root, quality and inversion
  • write and identify any diatonic triad or seventh chord by roman numeral and inversion symbol
  • identify chords by root and quality from a given figured bass or lead sheet
  • write diatonic melodies with attention to contour, tendency tones and harmonic implications
  • write 1:1 counterpoint
  • learn principles of harmonic progression including types of root movement, chord function, common progressions, and harmonic sequence
  • part-write harmonic progressions of root-position and first-inversion triads in a variety of exercises in three and four voices, including bass harmonization, melody harmonization, and figured bass
  • perform harmonic analysis of tonal examples from the literature
 

MUS 1302

Theory II

3

A continuation of MUS 1301, including non-chord tones, 2:1 counterpoint, seventh chords, and basic formal structure. Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of C in MUS 1301.

V. MUS 1302 Theory II

             MUS 1302 is a continuation of MUS 1301, and includes units on second inversion triads; 2-to-1 counterpoint; seventh chords; and cadences, phrases, and phrases in combination.

 

This course will enable students to:

  • build speed and confidence in writing and identifying diatonic triads and seventh chords in various inversions through timed drills
  • write and identify non-chord tones
  • write and identify cadences by type
  • identify and diagram phrases in combination
  • write diatonic melodies based on a given motive, chord progression or period form
  • write 2:1 counterpoint giving attention to implied harmony and to the use of dissonance as non-chord tones
  • part-write harmonic progressions in three and four voices, including second inversion triads and diatonic seventh chords in a variety of exercises including bass harmonization, melody harmonization, and figured bass
  • perform harmonic analysis of tonal, diatonic examples from the literature which include seventh chords in various inversions

 

 

MUS 2101

Musicianship III

1

A continuation of MUS 1102, designed as the aural skills complement to MUS 2301. Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of C in MUS 1102; and credit or concurrent enrollment in MUS 2301.

VIII. MUS 2101 Musicianship III

            MUS 2101 is a continuation of MUS 1102, and is designed as the aural skills complement to MUS 2301.

 

This course will enable students to:

  • aurally recognize any simple interval presented melodically or harmonically
  • sing and recognize diatonic and altered scale degrees in any order in any major or minor key
  • perform rhythms (both prepared and at-sight) and take rhythmic dictation in simple, compound, and irregular meters, including subdivisions, triplets, duplets, syncopation, and simple cross-rhythms
  • sing melodies (both prepared and at-sight) including chromaticism and modulation
  • take melodic dictation of examples up to 40 notes in length including chromaticism and modulation
  • take harmonic dictation (bass, melody and chords) of progressions including altered chords and modulation
take contrapuntal dictation of two-voice examples, including rhythmic independence, sequence, imitation and chromaticism

 

 

MUS 2102

Musicianship IV

1

A continuation of MUS 2101, designed as the aural skills complement to MUS 2302. Emphasizes singing and dictating melodies, rhythms, and chords commonly encountered in late nineteenth and twentieth-century music. Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of C in MUS 2101; and credit or concurrent enrollment in MUS 2302.

X.   MUS 2102 Musicianship IV

            MUS 2102 is a continuation of MUS 2101, and is designed as the aural skills complement to MUS 2302.  This course emphasizes identifying, singing, and/or transcribing by ear melodies, rhythms, and chord progressions/successions commonly encountered in music from the late nineteenth century to the present.

 

This course will enable students to identify and/or transcribe by ear:

  • compound intervals presented both melodically and harmonically
  • melodies up to 50 pitches in length, based on diatonic modes and chromatic, pentatonic, octatonic, whole tone, and lydian-mixolydian scales
  • atonal melodies up to 25 pitches in length, based on a limited number of interval-class types, pitch-class set types, and 12-tone rows
  • passages of  2-voice polyphony featuring the types of melodies listed above
  • harmonic progressions using common-practice diatonic and altered chords, presented in the context of remote modulations, enharmonic modulations, and passages of shifting or suspended tonality
  • chord progressions/successions using triads, added-note chords, seventh chords and commonly used ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords, including chords and successions encountered in jazz and popular music
  • basic types of sonorities encountered after 1900, including open fifths, quintal chords, quartal chords, extended tertian chords, split-member chords, added-note chords, polychords, secundal chords, and whole-tone chords
  • rhythms containing/expressing the following features:  changing between simple and compound meter with the division of the beat constant, changing between simple and compound meter with the beat constant, three notes in two beats, two notes in three beats, four against three, four notes in three beats, three notes in four beats, quintuplets and septuplets, five-eight and other asymmetrical meters

 

By the end of Musicianship IV students will be able to perform at sight:

  • one-part and two-part rhythms containing/expressing the features listed immediately above, plus cross-rhythms and tempo modulation
  • from a given pitch, diatonic modes and pentatonic, octatonic, whole tone, and lydian-mixolydian scales
  • melodies containing/expressing the following features:  modulation to distantly related keys, diatonic modes, changing clefs, exotic (pentatonic, whole tone, lydian-mixolydian, octatonic) scales, post-1900 interval successions, and serialism

 

 

MUS 2301

Theory III

3

A continuation of MUS 1302, emphasizing chromaticism in tonal harmony and introducing standard musical forms. Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of C in MUS 1302.

VII. MUS 2301 Theory III

            MUS 2301 is a continuation of MUS 1302, emphasizing chromaticism in tonal harmony.

 

This course will enable students to:

  • spell, write, and identify altered chords, including secondary functions, borrowed chords, and Neapolitan and augmented-sixth chords
  • build speed and confidence in the activities listed above through timed drills
  • write melodies including chromaticism and modulation
  • write two-voice contrapuntal examples including implied altered chords and modulation
  • part-write progressions incorporating altered chords in a variety of exercises, including figured bass, unfigured bass, and melody harmonization
  • analyze and part-write modulating examples including common-chord modulation to closely related keys, modulation to remote keys through altered pivot chords, and enharmonic modulation

 

 

 

MUS 2302

Theory IV

3

A survey of late nineteenth and twentieth-century compositional techniques and methods of analysis, including scales, chords, rhythmic techniques, approaches to tonality, set theory, and serialism. Prerequisite(s): Minimum grade of C in MUS 2301.

IX. MUS 2302 Theory IV

            MUS 2302 is a survey of late nineteenth and post-1900 compositional materials, techniques, and methods of analysis.

 

This course will enable students to:

  • identify common characteristics of late nineteenth-century extended tonality
  • spell and analyze 20th- and 21st-century scale types
  • spell and analyze 20th- and 21st-century chord types, using lead-sheet notation and descriptive labels as appropriate
  • analyze and write melodies in 20th- and 21st-century styles using appropriate pitch collections, melodic and rhythmic characteristics, and methods of construction
  • analyze and employ 20th- and 21st-century rhythmic techniques
  • analyze and employ 20th- and 21st-century harmony, voice-leading techniques, and tonal techniques, including both tertian and non-tertian pitch-centricity, parallelism, polytonality, and pandiatonicism
  • place any pitch collection in best normal order, identify its prime form, construct its interval-class vector, and select its set-class from a list of set classes
  • analyze and compose music employing nonserial atonality using pitch-class set theory
  • construct a twelve-tone row and analyze its properties, construct a matrix, and analyze and compose music employing serial atonality

 

 

MUS 3301

Theory V

3

Harmonic and structural analysis of larger forms, including variations, rondo, sonata, and contrapuntal forms. Prerequisite(s): MUS 2302 and credit or concurrent enrollment in 2102.

XI. MUS 3301 Theory V Form and Analysis

            MUS 3301 emphasizes recognition and analysis of the structure of music, from the motivic level to the form of entire pieces.

 

This course will enable students to:

  • analyze phrase structures such as periods, phrase groups, and phrase expansion; and locate cadences and structural closures
  • recognize formal structures and sectional layouts of works, including binary, ternary, rondo, sonata, and sonata-rondo form
  • recognize works constructed from contrapuntal techniques and variation procedures
  • identify tonal plans in relation to forms
  • analyze the structural function of musical passages and discuss the melodic/harmonic techniques employed; i.e., sequence, motivic treatment, pedal, and circle-of-fifths
  • discuss thematic process, motivic development, and imitative procedures
  • analyze and discuss text-music relationships in vocal music
  • recognize adaptations of traditional formal procedures and new formal approaches in twentieth-century examples (e.g., golden mean, indeterminacy, moment form)
provide verbal or written description of formal structures and processes with the use of appropriate analytical terminology

 

 
 

Total

19

  

 

Dallas Baptist University

http://www.dbu.edu/fine_arts/music.asp

http://www.dbu.edu/fine_arts/m_choral_with_cr.asp

http://www.dbu.edu/academics/course_description.asp?course_num=MUSI

Req theory course

Title

Credit hours

Description

 
MUSI 1111Musicianship I1MUSI 1111   (1-2-0)   Musicianship I
A skill-building course in sightsinging and ear-training, to include solfege singing of major and minor melodies in both simple and compound meters, aural and rhythmic reading exercises, and melodic and harmonic dictation. Fall, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MUSI 1300 or a passing score on the Music Theory Placement Exam; and MUSI 1311, or concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1311.

MUS 1111:  Musicianship I

Course Design

 

Catalog Description:  A skill-building course in sightsinging and ear-training, to include solfege singing of major and minor melodies in both simple and compound meters, aural and rhythmic reading exercises, and melodic and harmonic dictation. Fall.

Prerequisites: Theory Placement Exam, MUSI 1100, or passing score on the Theory Placement Exam; MUSI 1300, and 1311; or concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1311.

 

Textbooks:

        A New Approach to Sightsinging, 4th ed., by Berkowitz, Fontrier, & Kraft (Norton)

        Developing Aural Skills, Vol. 1, by Barbara Wallace (Kees Academic Press)

        Studying Rhythm, 2nd ed., by Ann C. Hall (Prentice-Hall)

 

Course Content (Material to correspond to Chapters 1-8 of Tonal Harmony):

        Review of MUSI 1100 content

Review of (or introduction to) solfége in moveable do; minor do

        Rhythmic reading in simple meter (1 e & a) and in compound meter (1 la li 2 la li)

        Rhythmic dictation and error detection to include ties, rests, and dotted values; in simple meter (down to beat subdivision) and compound meters (down to beat division)

        Sing and identify all intervals (played melodically ascending and descending)

   Sightsing melodies in major and minor keys in solfége, both prepared and at sight, no syllables written in music (stepwise and with skips in I, IV, V, and V7)

        Melodic dictation and error detection of 4- to 6-measure melodies (stepwise and with skips in I, IV, V, and V7) in major and minor keys, played without break

        Harmonic dictation of progressions in major and minor keys, with 4 to 10 chords, using all diatonic triads, root position and first inversion.  (Omit minor key variants – subtonic [VII], minor v, and major IV.)

 

Skill Mastery:

        Sing melodies at sight in moveable do solfége

        Tap rhythm at sight

        Speak rhythm at sight in rhythmic syllables

        Dictation of rhythmic phrases, melodies, and harmonic progressions in 5-6 playings, 4-6 measures at a time

 

 
MUSI 1112Musicianship II1MUSI 1112   (1-2-0)   Musicianship II
A continuation of MUSI 1111. Fall, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MUSI 1111, 1311, 1312, or concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1312.
 

MUS 1112:  Musicianship II

Course Design

 

Catalog Description:  A continuation of MUSI 1111. Spring

Prerequisites:  MUSI 1111, 1311, and either 1312, or concurrent enrollment in MUSI 1312.

 

Required Textbooks:

        A New Approach to Sightsinging, 4th ed., by Berkowitz, Fontrier, & Kraft (Norton)

        Developing Aural Skills, Vol. 2, by Barbara Wallace (Kees Academic Press)

        Studying Rhythm, Ann C. Hall (Prentice-Hall)

 

Course Content (Material to correspond to Chapters 9-15 of Tonal Harmony):

        Rhythmic reading in simple and compound meters, through subdivision of the beat.  (Students will read single-line rhythmic patterns in rhythmic syllables, tap single-line rhythmic patterns at reasonable performance tempo, tap two-line rhythmic patterns, or speak one line and tap the other simultaneously.)

        Rhythmic dictation and Error Detection of examples in simple and compound meters, through beat subdivision, including ties, syncopation, and triplets and duplets

        Sing and identify all intervals (played melodically and harmonically, ascending or descenging)

        Sing in solfège at sight melodies with all diatonic skips and with chromatic pitches

        Melodic dictation and Error Detection of 4- to 8-measure melodies (comparable to difficulty level of sightsinging) played without break

        Sing from any chord member all types of seventh chords

        Identify all types of seventh chords

        Harmonic dictation of progressions with 4 to 10 chords, including all diatonic triads and seventh chords, root position and all inversions

        Aural recognition of cadences and NCTs

        Sing and identify chromatically altered scale degrees.

 

Skill Mastery:

        Sing melodies at sight in moveable do solfège without syllables or rhythm written in the music.  Be able to:

·         maintain key feeling

·         sing accurate intervals

·         perform rhythm accurately and at a reasonable tempo

        Tap rhythm at sight, both single-line rhythm and rhythmic duets.

 

Solfège System used:  Moveable do; do-based minor:

            do  re  me  fa  sol  la  ti  do  te  le  sol  fa  me  re  do

 

Rhythmic Syllables used:

        Simple:        1                   2

                           1      &           2      &

                           1  e  &  a       2  e  &  a

 

        Compound: 1                         2  

                           1       la      li       2       la      li

                        1          ta         la         ta         li          ta         2          ta         la         ta         li          ta

 
  3MUSI 1311   (3-3-0)   Music Theory I
A step-by-step study of the basic organization of music, from scale and chord structure to traditional four-part harmony. Students develop skills in analyzing music, writing elementary tonal music, and improvising written harmonizations to melodic lines. Fall, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MUSI 1300 or a passing score on the Music Theory Placement Exam.
 

MUSI 1311:  Theory I

Course Design

 

Catalog Description:  A step-by-step study of the basic organization of music, from scale and chord structure to traditional four-part harmony. Students develop skills in analyzing music, writing elementary tonal music, improvising written harmonizations for melodic lines, and playing and transposing chord progressions. Fall.

Prerequisite: MUSI 1300 or passing Music Theory Placement Examination.

 

Textbooks:

        Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., by Kostka and Payne, McGraw-Hill, 2008

        Workbook for Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., by Kostka and Payne, McGraw-Hill, 2008

 

Course Content (Chapters 1-8 of Tonal Harmony):

        Review of fundamentals of music theory

        Triads and seventh chords

        Figured bass and inversion symbols

        Lead Sheet symbols

        Analysis of diatonic triads and seventh chords (Roman Numerals)

        Part-writing root position and first inversion triads

        Understanding typical Common-Practice period harmonic progression

        Writing and analyzing harmonic sequences

 

Skill Mastery:

        Pass five timed Skill Tests with score of at least 80% in order to pass course:

            1.  Major and Minor Scales (add accidentals)

            2.  Key Signatures (identify and write)

            3.  Intervals (analyze numeric value of intervals)

            4.  Diatonic Triads (notate major triads on the staff in root position)

            5.  Diatonic Triads (notate minor triads on the staff in root position)

        Thorough knowledge of part-writing principles

        Completion of semester tests in a one-hour time limit

        Completion of Keyboard Tests in a set time limit

 

Technology Applications:

        Four computer notation projects in Sibelius to include the following:

·         basics of computer notation

·         note entry

·         copy/paste

·         editing

·         lyrics

·         score formatting

 
  3MUSI 1312   (3-3-0)   Music Theory II
A continuation of MUSI 1311. Fall, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: MUSI 1311.

 

MUS 1312:  Theory II

Course Design

 

Catalog Description:  A continuation of MUSI 1311.

        Prerequisite:  MUS 1311

 

Textbooks:

        Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., by Kostka and Payne, McGraw-Hill, 2008

        Workbook for Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., by Kostka and Payne, McGraw-Hill, 2008

 

Course Content (Chapters 9-15 of Tonal Harmony):

        Part-writing second inversion triads

        Form (cadences, phrase structure, periods)

        Non-Chord Tones

        Part-writing seventh chords

        Harmonic sequences with seventh chords

        Hemiola

        Extended figured bass

        Melody harmonization in three- and four-voice textures

 

Skill Mastery:

        Pass four timed Skill Tests with a score of at least 80% in order to pass course:

            1.  Notate diatonic triads on the staff

            2.  Analyze diatonic triads

            3.  Analyze seventh chords in block format

            4.  Analyze chord root and quality in musical context

 

Technology Applications:

        Four computer notation projects in Sibelius:

·         realization of lead sheet symbols

·         arranging for instruments

·         harmonization of an original melody, arranging an accompaniment

orchestrating the original melody and accompaniment

 
  1MUSI 2111   (1-2-0)   Musicianship III
A continuation of MUSI 1112. A skill-building course in solfege sightsinging and ear-training. Emphasis will be placed on sightsinging and aural exercises that involve chromaticism, altered chords, and modulations. Fall. Prerequisite: MUSI 1112, 1312, 2311, or concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2311.
 

MUSI 2111:  Musicianship III

Course Design

 

Catalog Description

A continuation of MUSI 1112. A skill-building course in solfege sightsinging and ear-training. Emphasis will be placed on sightsinging and aural exercises that involve chromaticism, altered chords, and modulations. Fall.

Prerequisites: MUSI 1112, 1312, and either 2311, or concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2311.

 

Textbooks:

        A New Approach to Sightsinging, 4th ed., by Berkowitz, Fontrier, & Kraft (Norton)

        Developing Aural Skills, Vol. 3, by Barbara Wallace (Kees Academic Press)

        Studying Rhythm, Ann C. Hall (Prentice-Hall)

 

Course Content  (Material to correspond to Chapters 16-22 of Tonal Harmony):

        Rhythmic reading involving syncopation, more difficult rhythm patterns, triplets and duplets together, etc. (read single-line rhythmic patterns in rhythmic syllables, tap single-line rhythmic patterns at reasonable performance tempo; tap two-line rhythmic patterns, or speak one line and tap the other simultaneously)

        Rhythmic dictation and Error Detection of more advanced rhythmic patterns

   Sightsing (sing at sight) modulating melodies and melodies with chromatically altered tones

        Melodic dictation and Error Detection of 4- to 8-measure melodies (comparable to difficulty level of sightsinging) played without break

        Harmonic dictation of progressions with 4 to 10 chords, involving modulations to closely-related keys, secondary dominant and secondary leading tone chords, borrowed chords, and Neapolitan Sixth chords

 

Skill Mastery:

        Sing modulating melodies at sight in moveable do solfège, without syllables or rhythm written in the music.

·            maintain key feeling

·            be able to sing accurate intervals

·            be able to sing altered tones correctly

·            perform rhythm accurately and at a reasonable tempo

        Tap rhythm at sight, both single-line rhythm and rhythmic duets.

 
  1MUSI 2112   (1-2-0)   Musicianship IV
A continuation of MUSI 2111. Spring. Prerequisite: MUSI 2111, 2311, 2312, or concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2312.
 

MUSI 2112:  Musicianship IV

Course Design

 

Catalog Description

A continuation of MUSI 2111. Spring.

Prerequisites: MUSI 2111, 2311, and either 2312, or concurrent enrollment in MUSI 2312.

 

Textbooks:

        A New Approach to Sightsinging, 4th ed., by Berkowitz, Fontrier, & Kraft (Norton)

        Developing Aural Skills, Vol. 4, by Barbara Wallace (Kees Academic Press)

        Studying Rhythm, Ann C. Hall (Prentice-Hall)

 

Course Content  (Material to correspond to Chapters 22-28 of Tonal Harmony):

        Rhythmic reading difficult rhythm patterns, mixed meter, etc. (read single-line rhythmic patterns in rhythmic syllables, tap single-line rhythmic patterns at reasonable performance tempo; tap two-line rhythmic patterns, or speak one line and tap the other simultaneously)

        Rhythmic dictation and Error Detection of more advanced rhythmic patterns, changing meters, and assymetrical meters

   Sightsing (sing at sight) melodies with more chromaticism, modal melodies, melodies that modulate to foreign keys, melodies based on twentieth-century scale forms, and atonal melodies

        Melodic dictation and Error Detection of 4- to 8-measure melodies (comparable to difficulty level of sightsinging) played without break

        Harmonic dictation of progressions with 4 to 10 chords, involving modulations to remote keys, augmented sixth chords, enharmonic modulations, modal harmony, and bitonality

        Aural recognition of advanced altered chords, extended tertian harmony, and modal melodies

 

Skill Mastery:

        Sing advanced melodies at sight, without syllables or rhythm written in the music.

·            demonstrate precision of advanced melodies

·            perform advanced rhythm accurately and at a reasonable tempo

        Tap rhythm at sight, both single-line rhythm and rhythmic duets.

 
  3MUSI 2311   (3-3-0)   Music Theory III
The study of advanced harmony (including larger Baroque and Classical forms, modulations, altered chords, and the harmonic vocabulary of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries) with emphasis on analysis, part-writing, improvisational composition projects in various styles. Fall. Prerequisite: MUSI 1312.

 

MUS 2311:  Theory III

Course Design

 

Catalog Description:  The study of advanced harmony (including larger Baroque and Classical forms, modulations, altered chords, and the harmonic vocabulary of the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries) with emphasis on analysis, part-writing, improvisational composition projects in various styles, and playing and transposing chord progressions. Fall.

Prerequisite:  MUSI 1312.

 

Textbooks:

        Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., by Kostka and Payne, McGraw-Hill, 2008

        Workbook for Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., by Kostka and Payne, McGraw-Hill, 2008

 

Course Content (Chapters 16-23 of Tonal Harmony):

        Secondary dominant and secondary leading tone chords

        Modulations

        Binary and ternary forms

        Borrowed chords and mode mixture

        Neapolitan chords

        Augmented sixth chords

 

Technology Applications:

        Four computer notation projects in Sibelius covering more advanced notation concepts


 
 
  3MUSI 2312   (3-3-0)   Music Theory IV
Continuation of MUSI 2311. The study of late nineteenth-century and twentieth-century compositional techniques with emphasis on analysis, and improvisational composition projects in various styles. Spring. Prerequisite: MUSI 2311.

 

MUS 2312:  Theory IV

Course Design

 

Catalog Description:  A continuation of MUSI 2311. The study of late nineteenth-century and twentieth-century compositional techniques with emphasis on analysis, and improvisational composition projects in various styles.  Spring.

Prerequisite:  MUSI 2311.

 

Textbooks:

        Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., by Kostka and Payne, McGraw-Hill, 2008 (plus supplemental materials)

        Workbook for Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., by Kostka and Payne, McGraw-Hill, 2008

 

Course Content (Chapters 24-28 of Tonal Harmony):

        Augmented sixth chords (unusual inversions, enharmonic spellings)

        Enharmonic spellings of various chords

        Enharmonic modulations

        Substitute dominants

        Ninth, eleventh, and thirteenth chords

        Late nineteenth-century harmony

        Diatonic church modes

        Non-diatonic scale forms

        Twentieth-century harmony

        Set theory

        The twelve-tone system

 

Technology Applications:

        Notate a composition on computer.

 

 
MUSI 3201Analysis of Musical Structure2MUSI 3201   (2-2-0)   Analysis of Musical Structure
An in-depth study of the analysis of musical forms, including sonata form, sonata-rondo, classical concerto, Baroque variation forms, and fugue. Fall. Prerequisite: MUSI 2312.
 

SYLLABUS

MUS 2301, Section 01 – Analysis of Musical Structure

Dallas Baptist University, Fall, 2008

Dr. Barbara K. Wallace, Professor

 

Office: Blackaby 302

Phone: 214-333-5314 (office)

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

1:00-3:00

8:00-10:00

1:00-3:00

8:00-10:00

 

 

11:00-12:00

 

11:00-12:00

12:00-1:00

 

1:00-2:00

 

1:00-2:00

 

Email:  barbaraw@dbu.edu

Office Hours:  

(Subject to change –  Check my office door.  Other hours available by appointment.)

 

Class Time/Location:  TTh 12:00-12:50 p.m., Blackaby 306

 

D.B.U. Mission Statement:  The purpose of Dallas Baptist University is to provide Christ-centered quality higher education in the arts, sciences, and professional studies at both the undergraduate and graduate levels to traditional age and adult students in order to produce servant leaders who have the ability to integrate faith and learning through their respective callings.

 

Course Description:  An in-depth study of the analysis of musical forms, including sonata form, sonata-rondo, classical concerto, Baroque variation forms, and fugue. 

      Prerequisite: MUSI 2312.  Fall.

 

Learner-Centered Course Objectives and Outcomes:  The objective of Analysis of Musical Structure is for the student to demonstrate mastery of the various types of formal structure of tonal music, such as sonata form, sonata-rondo, classical concerto, Baroque variation forms, and fugue.  The overall learning experience will develop competencies that will lead to opportunities for music-related Christian service to God and mankind.  Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

o   discuss the characteristics of the common formal structures of tonal music.

o   analyze various pieces in the Common Practice period.

o   complete an analytical paper, discussing the structure of music.

o   apply the above concepts in a historical framework.

 

Required Textbooks and Class Materials

Anthology for Musical Analysis, Postmodern Update, 6th ed., by Burkhart  (ISBN:  0-534-63828-7)

      Study Score:  Mozart, Symphonies 40 and 41

      Study Score:  Beethoven, Symphony No. 5

      Study Score:  Beethoven, Symphony No. 3

 

Course Outline:

 

      Aug. 25 –  Sep. 30         Unit I:  Bar form, strophic form, Baroque variation forms, Golden Ratio

      Oct 2 – Nov. 11             Unit II:  Sonata form

      Nov. 13 – Dec. 18          Unit III:  Sonata Rondo form, Rondo form, Concerto form

 

SEE HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT/TEST SCHEDULE FOR SPECIFIC DATES.

 

Requirements for Credit:

 

      1. Homework:  Consistent and timely completion of homework is necessary in a course of this nature.  Homework will be assigned in almost every class period.  Students will be prepared to discuss their findings in each class session.

 

      2.  Participation:  The “Participation” points for this course will be earned by student preparation for class discussions, oral contribution, homework completion, and by attendance and punctuality.

 

      3.  Projects:  Two major analysis papers will be assigned as the two projects.  Projects may be accepted up to a week late, but will have a 10-point penalty.  Students not turning projects in at the class period due date will not be permitted to attend class that day, because of the discussion of the projects. 

 

      4.  Tests:  Major tests can be made up only for excused absences (illness with a note from a doctor or nurse, death in the family, or a university-excused absence).

Text Box: Final grades will be assigned as follows:
Grade:      Points:         Percentage       GPA Points:
A+        686 - 700        98-100%             4.00
A           651 - 685        93 - 97%             4.00
A-         630 - 650        90 - 92%             3.67
B+         609 - 629        87 - 89%             3.33
B           588 - 608        84 - 86%             3.00
B-         560 - 587        80 - 83%             2.67
C+         539 - 559        77 - 79%             2.33
C           518 - 538        74 - 76%             2.00
C-         490 - 517        70 - 73%             1.67
D+        476 - 489        68 - 69%             1.33
D           462 - 475        66 - 67%             1.00
D-         448 - 461        64 - 65%               .67
F                0 - 447           0 - 63%                  0

      5.  Grading:

              Homework and Participation     100

              Project 1                                     100

              Project 2                                     100

              Written Tests (2 @ 100 each)    200

              Final Exam                               200

              Total                                          700             

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Attendance:  According to DBU academic policy, attendance in class is considered a necessary factor in the learning process.  Therefore, absences for all reasons must be kept to a minimum and should not exceed 25 percent of the total class time.  Students are held responsible for all academic work required or performed during their absence regardless of the reasons for those absences. Students who register late are responsible for work missed. The policy concerning class attendance for individual courses, seminars, or other guided learning experiences will be determined by the faculty members in charge of such course, seminar, or learning experience.

Every student is expected to attend class.  Major tests can be made up for excused absences only.  Absences due to illness require a note signed by a doctor or nurse.  Classes will begin promptly.  University policy states that to receive course credit, a student should not miss more than 25% of the classes during a semester.  Seven (7) total absences will be allowed.  The eleventh (8th) absence (excused or unexcused) will result in an “F” for the course.  If you are absent, it is your responsibility to find out what material was covered and what assignments were made.

 

Learner-Centered Assessment of Outcomes:  The student will demonstrate development, progress, and mastery of musical structure and analysis.  He/She will be assessed according to the quality, and accuracy of their homework, class participation, projects, and tests.  (See details above.)

 

Methods of Instruction:  The primary type of instruction to be used is presentation of material, demonstration, student response and discussion, and sample analyses.

 

Bibliography:

Green.  Form in Tonal Music (MT 58.G75 1979)

      Spencer/Temko.  A Practical Approach to the Study of Form in Music  (MT S8 .S63 P7 1994)

Berry, Wallace.  Form in Music  (MT 58 .B34 1986)

      Sadie, Stanley, ed.  The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians

      Diamond.  Music Analyses:  An Annotated Guide . . .  (ML 128 .A7 D5 1991)

      Rosen.  Sonata Forms  (ML 1156 .R67 1988)

      Tovey.  Essays in Musical Analysis  (MT 90 .T6 E5)

      Leichtentritt.  Musical Form  (MT 58 .L452)

      Morris.  The Structure of Music  (MT 58 .M88 S8 1966)

      Ulrich.  Symphonic Music  (ML 1260 .U4)

      Walker.  A Study in Musical Analysis  (MT 6 .W166 S8 1962)

      White.  The Analysis of Music  (MT 6 .W4147 A6 1984)

 

Financial Aid:  Students who are receiving federal, state, or institutional financial aid who withdraw or add hours during the semester may have their financial aid adjusted because of the withdraw or addition.  This change in schedule may affect the aid they are receiving during the current semester, and could affect their eligibility for aid in future semesters.

 

Disabilities:  The student has the responsibility of informing the Dean of Students, at (214) 333-5134, of any disabling condition for which the student will request course modifications.  Dallas Baptist University provides academic adjustments and auxiliary aid to individuals with disabilities, as defined under law, who are otherwise qualified to meet the institution’s academic requirements.  It is the student’s choice and responsibility to initiate any request for accommodations.  Required documentation must be provided before the university can make accommodations.

 

Honor Code and Appeals:  The faculty member endorses the University Honor Code and abides by the University’s Academic Appeal and Academic Misconduct Procedure as stated in the Student Handbook and the Schedule of Classes.

 

Academic Integrity:  Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated in any form (cheating, copying homework, plagiarism, etc.). Plagiarism shall be defined as the appropriation, theft, purchase, memorization, or obtaining by any means another’s work, and the unacknowledged submission or incorporation of that work as one’s offered for credit.  (Appropriation includes the quoting or paraphrasing of another’s work without giving credit therefore.) See D.B.U. catalog, Student Handbook, and the Music Department Handbook for general policies.

 

Posting of Final Course Grades:  Final course grades provided to a student by a faculty member may not be relied upon as official.  Students may access their official final grades online through the WebAdvisor System.  The Registrar’s Office will only mail grades to a student upon request.  The Dallas Baptist University undergraduate and graduate catalogs state that “All accounts must be paid in full before a student can...receive transcripts...”  According to FERPA, faculty may not provide final grade information to students via telephone, email, posting or any other source which might compromise student confidentiality.

 

Children in Classes and Unaccompanied Children:  Minor children of Dallas Baptist University students are not permitted to attend class with their parents.  Furthermore, minor children may not be unaccompanied at any location or property where Dallas Baptist University classes are taught.  If a minor child is brought to the DBU campus or any location where DBU classes are taught, the child must be accompanied by an adult at all times.  For their safety and welfare, unaccompanied children on the DBU campus will be escorted to the Campus Security Office and the parents or guardians will be summoned to pick them up immediately.

 

Cell Phone Policy:  Classroom disruption by cell phones or other electronic devices is prohibited. All cell phones and similar electronic devices must remain turned off and out of sight for the duration of class. Electronic devices utilized in a learning context, such as laptops and language interpreters, may be permitted at the professor’s discretion. A student may face a zero and/or failure in the class if an electronic device is used for cheating during a test. Cheating at Dallas Baptist University is not tolerated and may result in expulsion.

 

Graduating Students Grades:  It is the responsibility of the student to notify the instructor if graduating this semester.  Final exams for graduating students will be given on the morning of Monday, Dec. 15.  Final grades for graduates are due in the Registrar’s Office by noon on Monday, Dec. 15.  These grades are final.  The instructor will not submit late grades for graduate nor change grades once they are submitted.

 

Record Keeping: Please keep ALL papers and projects handed back.  Should there ever be a question about your grade, we will only be able to resolve it if you have documentation.

 

Important Dates:

Last day to add: 9-5-08

Last day to withdraw:  11-7-08

Final Exam:  Thursday, December 18, 10:00-noon.


 

 
  2MUSI 4201   (2-2-0)   Orchestration
Study of the capabilities and limitations of orchestral and band instruments, analysis of scores, and scoring projects for small and large instrumental ensembles. Fall. Prerequisite: MUSI 2312.
 
 
 Total20  
     

East Texas Baptist University

http://www.etbu.edu/Academics/Semester_by_Semester_Plans/School_of_Fine_Arts/Music/default.htm

http://www.etbu.edu/php/semesterplans/view.php?planid=400

https://www.etbu.edu/Forms/Catalogs/2008-2009.pdf

Req theory course

Title

Credit hours

Description

Required courses

MUSI 1100 Introduction to Music.......................................................................................................1

MUSI 1116, 1117 Elementary Ear Training I, II...............................................................................2

MUSI 2116, 2117 Advanced Ear Training I, II..................................................................................2

MUSI 1311, 1312 Elementary Harmony I, II....................................................................................6

MUSI 2312 Advanced Harmony...........................................................................................................3

MUSI 3303 Form and Analysis.............................................................................................................3

MUSI 3203 20th Century Analytical Techniques................................................................................2

 

 
MUSI 1100 Introduction to Music1MUSI 1100 Introduction to Music (1,0,1)
This course is designed to acquaint the beginning student with an overview of the field of classical music. It will
deal with styles, major periods, media of performance, textures, literature, and music research. It is designed for
majors and minors in music and any others interested in a brief survey of the field.

MUSI 1100:  Introduction to Music

Friday- 8:00-8:50 a.m.

Spring 2009

Dr. Virginia Lile Boaz, professor

Office: JG 104, x 2165; Home: 923-9545; email: vboaz@etbu.edu

Office Hours:  By Appointment

 

Catalog Description:  This course is designed to acquaint the beginning student with an overview of the field of music. It will deal with styles, major periods, media of performance, textures, literature, [employment opportunities, and aptitude testing].  It is designed for majors and minors in music and any others interested in a brief survey of the field.

 

I. Course Objectives:

·         to trace the development of Western Music from the Medieval through the Contemporary period

·         to become familiar with the most important terms, forms, instruments, and composers of Western art music

·         to develop a basic music vocabulary for describing music of all types

·         to understand the cultural and historical background of Western music

·         to understand music’s function in society

·         to develop listening skills in order to be able to recognize by sight and sound the music of particular eras

 

II. Course Requirements and Evaluation

 

A.   Quizzes (60%)-DAILY quizzes will be given at the beginning of each class period over reading and listening assignments. These will take approximately 5 minutes, so students who are regularly tardy will be in danger of missing quizzes.  Please be on time.  One assigned Take-Home Quiz will be worth two (2) quiz grades.

B.   Tests (40%)- Two (2) exams will be given during the semester over course materials. Exams will be a balance of both objective and subjective evaluation.

 

 

III. Course Policies

 

A.   According to ETBU policy, you are allowed 3 (25%) absences throughout the

semester, before failing the class based solely on your attendance.  On the fourth (4th) absence, you will be notified that you have failed the course and will receive a WX on your transcript. Attendance will be taken by turning in an index card at the beginning of each class period.

 

B. Quizzes and Exams

            1. There are NO MAKEUP QUIZZES.  The lowest three (3) quiz grades will automatically be dropped. 

            2. If you need to have a makeup exam, it is your responsibility to schedule it with the instructor at least a week in advance.  Failure to do so will result in a “zero” for that exam.  Only legitimate excuses, such as severe illness (requires a doctor’s note), death in the family, etc. will be considered for a makeup exam.

C. Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Office of Advising and Career Development in Scarborough Hall, Room 104, and providing the required documentation.  If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations. You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor.

D. The instructor reserves the right to modify any portion of the syllabus as may become necessary due to events or circumstances that may occur during the semester.

 

IV. Required Texts/Materials

 

·                     Kamien, Roger.  Music:  An Appreciation.  Sixth Brief Edition. Boston,

            Mass.:  McGraw-Hill, 2008.

·                     Index Cards (Color, size, and style are up to you).

 

V. Optional Texts/Materials (On reserve in the Music Lab)

 

·                     CD set (5 CDs) Music: An Appreciation.  Ninth Edition/Sixth Brief Edition.                                      Boston, Mass.:  McGraw-Hill, 2008

·                     Poultney, David.  Studying Music History:  Learning, Reasoning, and Writing                     About Music History and Literature.  2nd ed.  Upper Saddle River, New                     Jersey:  Prentice Hall, 1996.

 

We will cover the following topics:

Unit II:  The Middle Ages and Renaissance (pp. 59-90)          

Unit III:  The Baroque Period (pp. 91-148)

Unit IV:  The Classical Period (pp. 149-206)

Unit V:  The Romantic Period (pp. 207-286)

Unit VI:  The Twentieth Century and Beyond (pp. 287-304)

 

 

VI. Course Schedule

 

F 1/16             Course Introduction/ Music in the Middle Ages (pp. 59-78)

 

F 1/23             Music in the Renaissance (pp. 78-89); The Baroque Period (pp. 90-100)               

F 1/30             Baroque, continued (pp. 100-129)

 

F 2/6               Baroque, continued (pp. 130-147)                       

 

F 2/13             TMEA- No Class

                        TAKE-HOME QUIZ DUE NEXT WEEK

                       

F 2/20             TAKE-HOME QUIZ DUE

The Classical Period (pp. 149-172

 

F 2/27             Classical, continued (pp. 172-192)

 

F 3/6               Classical, continued (pp. 193-205)

 

F 3/13             TEST #1

 

MARCH 16-20 SPRING BREAK

 

F 3/27             The Romantic Period (pp. 207-230)

 

F 4/3               Romantic, continued (pp. 231-255)

 

APRIL 10- GOOD FRIDAY HOLIDAY

 

F 4/17             Romantic, continued (pp. 256-277)

           

F 4/24             Romantic: Wagner (pp. 278-285)

                        The Twentieth Century (pp. 287-304 [up to Impressionism and Symbolism])

 

 

 

TEST #2- MONDAY, APRIL 27- 8:00-9:50

 

 
MUSI 1116Elementary Ear Training I1MUSI 1116 Elementary Ear Training I (1,0,1)
Elementary Ear Training I is an applied skills course designed to develop skills in sight singing, rhythmic reading, improvising short melodic and rhythmic phrases and notating melodies, rhythms and chords using
folk, western and non-western melodies. Prerequisites: MUSI 1311 or concurrent enrollment.

MUSI 1116 - Ear Training I

Fall 2008

Mr. Ray Herman                                                                                 rherman@etbu.edu

J.G. 103, Ext. 2161                                    Office Hours as posted on bulletin board

 

 

            I.      Catalog Description: Elementary Ear Training I is an applied skills course designed to develop skills in sight singing, rhythmic reading, improvising short melodic and rhythmic phrases and notating melodies, rhythms and chords using folk, western and nonwestern melodies.

 

         II.      Prerequisites:  MUSI 1311 or concurrent enrollment.

 

     III.      Curriculum requirement:  BA – Music Major; BM – Sacred Music Major, Vocal Performance Major, Piano Performance Major, All-Level Music Education Major; Minors – Music Theory, Conducting.

 

      IV.      Textbooks (required):

a.      Music for Sight Singing, 7th Edition. Ottman and Rogers

b.      Dictation Packet – provided on first class day

 

          V.      Course Objectives:

·         To demonstrate reliable singing and music reading using folk, western, and nonwestern classical music;

·         To notate melodies, rhythms and harmonic progressions;

·         To accurately identify harmonic intervals and chord types;

·         To develop the ability to use solfege syllables.

 

   VII.      Teaching Methodology/Course Requirements:

1. Sight Singing (Performance):  Activities will be given in class to develop the ability to read rhythms and pitches accurately.  Practice outside of class is expected. Quizzes may be given in any class period without prior notice.  Material for these quizzes may be taken from the textbook, computer assignments, or outside sources.  Three small group exams will be given according to the course schedule.

 

2. Ear Training (Written):  Class activities will be used to develop these skills.  Practice outside of class is expected. Quizzes may be given in any class period without prior notice.  Material for these quizzes may be taken from the textbook, computer assignments, or outside sources.  Students will also be given assignments on the Aurelia software program.  As only one attempt will be allowed on each Aurelia quiz activity, students are encouraged to repeat all these exercises until they have mastered the skill.  Three exams will be given according to the course schedule.

 

 

 

VIII.      Course Calendar

This course will meet three days per week for approximately two-thirds of the semester. During the remainder of the semester assignments and other activities will be given for any student(s) who need extra help or who would like to improve their grade.**

 

      IX.      Attendance/Participation Requirements:

According to the ETBU catalogue (p.21), “(t)o be eligible to earn credit in a course, the student must attend at least 75 percent of all class meetings.” The eighth absence, for any reason, will result in failure of the class and loss of course credit.  Any student who fails to be seated in the classroom by the beginning of the class will be counted as tardy. Two tardies will be equivalent to one absence. Prior notification of any absence will be expected when possible. No course work missed due to absence will be made up unless prior arrangements have been made and the absence is the result of either a University approved event or other reason deemed acceptable by the instructor. Neither hats nor caps are to be worn during class.

 

         X.      Electronic Devices:

The use of electronic communication devices, including but not limited to cell phones, blackberries and laptop computers, will not be permitted in class. Please confirm that these are turned off prior to the start of class.

 

      XI.      Grade Computation:

Participation:                          40%

         (In class, small group and outside assignments)   

Exams: 

         Small Group                   30%

         Dictation                         30%

              

A=90-100

B=80-89

C=70-79

D=60-69

F=59 and below

 

  XII.      Disability Accommodation Statement:

Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Advising Office in SCAR 104 and providing the required documentation. If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations. You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor.

 

 

 

 

Tentative Course Schedule

 

Aug 25                        Course Introduction / Distribution of Packets

Aug 25-29                  Introduction to Solfege – History / Chant

Sept 1-5                      Rhythm – Terms / Beat Patterns / Rhythm Chart

Sept 8-17                    Rhythm – Other time signatures

                                    Solfege – Other keys, Treble and Bass clefs

Sept 15-17                  Solfege – Major Pattern / M2/m2

Sept 17                      Dictation Exam

Sept 19                     Small Group Exam

Sept 22-26                 Major Triads

                                    M3/m3 – M6/m6

                                    Rhythm – Compound Meters (Ottman Unit 4)

Sept 29-Oct 3            Minor Triads

                                    P4 – P5

Oct 6-8                       Diminished Triads

                                    Tritone

                                    Rhythm – Subdivision of the Beat (Ottman Unit 10)

Oct 8                         Dictation Exam

Oct 10                       Small Group Exam

Oct 13-17                    Augmented Triads

Oct 20-24                  Seventh Chords

Oct 27                         Review

Oct 29                       Final Exam: Dictation and Small Group

                        *Final Exam will be given during normally schedule class time.

Dec 8                         Second Final Exam

                        ** Second Final Exam will be given 10:30 – 12:20.

 

 
MUSI 1311 Elementary Harmony I3MUSI 1311 Elementary Harmony I (3,0,3)
Elementary Harmony I is a study of the principal chords in both major and minor modes with emphasis upon
part-writing and keyboard harmony.

Elementary Harmoni I:  MUSI 1311

Fall 2008

MWF: 8:00-8:50

JGMB 138


 

 

Thomas R. Webster, Ph.D.

   Office:          JGMB 102

   Phone:          Ext. 2158

   E-mail:         twebster@etbu.edu

   Office Hours: 

                        MW:    11:00-12:00; 2:00-4:00

                        T:         8:00-11:00

                        Th:       1:30-4:00

                        F:         11:00-12:00

 

Instructor’s Assistant Data

Jennifer Shafer

Tutoring Hours: See Posted Lab Schedule

Tutoring Location: JGMB 114

sha0787@etbu.edu

 

Course Description

Elementary Harmony I is a study of the principal chords in both major and minor modes with emphasis upon part-writing and keyboard harmony.

 

Course Prerequisite

There are no prerequisites for this course.  However, students ill-prepared for college-level music theory study may choose to complete MUSI 1300 Fundamentals of Music before taking this course.  A decision to do so will put music students one year behind in their music study, and consequently may extend their college work beyond four years.

 

Textbook and Materials

            Kostka, Stefan and Dorothy Payne, Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., Boston:  McGraw-Hill, 2009.

 

Kostka, Stefan and Dorothy Payne, Workbook for Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., Boston:  McGraw-Hill, 2009.

 


 

Course Outcomes and Objectives

Students completing this course should have a thorough understanding of the following areas:

·         Major and minor scales and key signatures

·         Melodic and harmonic intervals

·         Music terminology and vocabulary appropriate to the course content

·         Rhythm, meter, and time signatures

·         Triads and seventh chords

·         Functional use of chords in tonal harmony

·         Voice leading in four-part composition

·         Part writing in three- and four- part textures

·         Harmonic progressions

·         Composition techniques using all of the skills listed above

Students who complete this course will be prepared for additional study in music theory and upon completion of the entire theory curriculum will acquire:

·         An understanding of the common elements of organizational patterns of music and their interaction, and the ability to employ this understanding in aural, verbal, and visual analyses.

·         Sufficient understanding of musical forms, processes, and structures to use this knowledge in compositional, performance, scholarly, pedagogical, and historical contexts, according to the requisites of their specializations.

·         Rudimentary capacity to create derivative or original music in written form.

·         The ability to use music notation programs and to begin to develop an understanding of how these programs serve the field of music.

Students will:

·         Work independently on a variety of musical problems by combining their capabilities in performance; aural, verbal, and visual analysis; composition and improvisation; and history and repertory.

·         Begin to form and defend value judgments about music.

 

Expectations

In addition to the requirements and expectations listed elsewhere in this syllabus, students are expected to:

·         Arrive to class on time, if not early, with all materials including textbook, workbook, pencil, pen, notebook paper and staff paper

·         Come to every class having read the chapter, prepared to discuss the material

·         Work to master and increase speed of recall of the material cover in previous units/chapters.

 

Grade Computation

Each student’s grade will be computed based on the percentages below.

 

Homework Assignments         10%                 and                  25%

                        In-Class Quizzes                     10%                                         25%

                        Tests (6)                                  30%                                         25%

Final Exam                              50%                                         25%

 

The grade computation that most benefits the student will be used to determine the student’s final grade. 

 

Students who have successfully completed all TCAs (see below) prior to the last regularly scheduled class meeting may choose not to take the Final Exam.  In such cases the Test average will count 80% and 50% of the grade computations.

 

 

Timed Competency Assessments

In addition to the assignments, quizzes, Unit Tests, and Final Exam, each student will be required to successfully complete a timed competency assessment (TCA) on each topic within the chapters and units.  Each TCA will be given in class one time, but may be retaken as many times as necessary throughout the semester until the time of the final exam.  Students must successfully complete all the timed assessments in order to receive a passing grade for the class regardless of the grade earned. The assignments, quizzes and tests allow the student to demonstrate an understanding of the material, and the TCAs provide the student the opportunity to demonstrate mastery and application of that material sufficient to warrant its use in the subsequent music theory courses.  The TCAs do not affect the students’ grades, but they do affect successful completion of the course.

 

Assignments

Daily homework assignments will be given.  All assignments are to be completed before class begins and will be assessed during the class session in which each is due.  Students must be ready to turn in homework assignments at the beginning of each class period.  While students are encouraged to seek assistance from the instructor, the instructor’s assistant or other students, all assignments must be completed by the students turning in the work.  Homework assignments are not collaborative efforts of many students, and all assignments should represent the student’s individual work and understanding of the subject matter.

             

Quizzes

Short daily quizzes will be given at many class meetings.  These are designed to reinforce the students’ learning in previous classes and homework assignments, and to develop a greater speed in processing the information and course content.  All quizzes may be comprehensive, and all material from previous chapters may be covered at any time.

 

Tests

Unit tests will be given throughout the semester (see Tentative Course Schedule below).  Each test will be comprehensive and will require a thorough knowledge of the material presented in previous units.  Students are encouraged to solidify their understanding of the content in each unit and develop greater speed in processing and presenting that information throughout the semester.

 

Final Exam

The Final Exam will be administered on Wednesday, Dec 10, 2008 from 8:00-9:50 a.m.

 

Academic Integrity

“Academic integrity is one of the most important values maintained by the University.  Violations of academic policies, including ethical expectations are outlined in the course syllabus, the University Catalog, or other official University documents.  Violations are considered serious breaches of both personal integrity and the University’s student code of conduct.  Conflicts involving matters of academic integrity will follow the student grade appeals procedure.  These conflicts include:

A)    Plagiarism – This may be defined as the act of appropriating or giving out as one’s own the literary or artistic work of another.  (Facts of general knowledge are not considered to be covered by the definition of plagiarism.)

B)     Cheating – This is defined as falsifying work, copying work of another person, and use of unauthorized helps.

C)     Falsification of Records – Accuracy in completing forms for the permanent student records file is essential to the functioning of the University and to knowingly falsify or submit inaccurate data is a disciplinary offense.

D)    Use of unauthorized materials – for classroom and class use.”

 

Attendance Policy, Late Work, and Make-Up Work

Class attendance is critical to each student’s success in this course.  Attendance at every class meeting is expected.  Content information will be given in each class session; quizzes will be administered in many class sessions, and the discussion of course content is vital for the development of a complete understanding of the material. 

 

The University Class Attendance Policy (see page 21 of University Catalog) will be strictly enforced in this course.  No late work will be accepted and no quizzes or tests will be administered after a class has been missed except in extreme circumstances as determined by the instructor. 

 

Students who miss class due to illness or other personal matters must discuss the matter with the instructor who, if approved, will determine an alternate time to accept assignments and administer quizzes and tests.  In most cases these alternate times will be scheduled prior to the missed class, and students may be asked to produce verification of the situation (doctor’s note, etc.)

 

In the case of a University approved absence, the student must make arrangements to turn in assignments and take quizzes or tests prior to the missed class. 

 

Disability Statement

Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Advising Office in SCAR 104 and providing the required documentation.  If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations.  You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor. 
 

Tentative Course Schedule

 

Changes will be made to the schedule below as needed throughout the semester.  Students will always receive at least 2 class meeting notice of a change in the test schedule.

 

Aug 25             Course Introduction

Aug 27-Sept 5 Chapter 1: Elements of Pitch

Sept 8              Test 1

Sept 10-12       Chapter 1: Elements of Pitch (continued)

Sept 15            Test 2

Sept 17-26       Chapter 3: Triads and Seventh Chords

Oct 1               Test 3

Oct 1-15          Chapter 4: Diatonic Chords

Oct 17             Test 4

Oct 20-Nov 3  Chapter 5: Principles of Voice Leading

Nov 5              Test 5            

Nov 7-Dec 1   Chapter 6: Root Position Part Writing

Dec 3               Test 6

Dec 5               Final Exam review/TCA make-ups

 

Final Exam

The Final Exam will be administered on Wednesday, Dec 12, 2007 from 8:00-9:50 a.m.

           

 
MUSI 1117Elementary Ear Training II1MUSI 1117 Elementary Ear Training II (1,0,1)
This course is an extension of MUSI 1116 in the development of sight singing and ear training ability. The
class meets two hours per week. Prerequisites: MUSI 1116 and 1311.

MUSI 1117 – Elementary Ear Training II

Spring 2009

Mr. Ray Herman                                                                                 rherman@etbu.edu

J.G. 103, Ext. 2161                                    Office Hours as posted on bulletin board

 

 

            I.      Catalog Description: This course is an extension of MUSI 1116 in the development of sight singing and ear training ability. The class meets three hours per week for ten weeks.

 

         II.      Prerequisites:  MUSI 1116 and 1311.

 

     III.      Curriculum requirement:  BA – Music Major; BM – Sacred Music Major, Vocal Performance Major, Piano Performance Major, All-Level Music Education Major; Minors – Music Theory, Conducting.

 

      IV.      Textbooks (required):

a.      Music for Sight Singing, 7th Edition. Ottman and Rogers

b.      Dictation Packet - provided

 

          V.      Course Objectives:

·         To demonstrate reliable singing and music reading using folk, western, and nonwestern classical music;

·         To notate melodies, rhythms and harmonic progressions;

·         To accurately identify harmonic intervals and chord functions;

·         To detect melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic errors;

·         To develop the ability to use solfege syllables.

 

      VI.      Teaching Methodology/Course Requirements:

1. Sight Singing (Performance):  Activities will be given in class to develop the ability to read rhythms and pitches accurately.  Quizzes may be given in any class period without prior notice.  Material for these quizzes may be taken from the textbook, computer assignments, or outside sources.  Five tests, to include four unit tests plus the final exam, will be given according to the course schedule.

 

2. Ear Training (Written):  Class activities will be used to develop the ability accurately to identify and notate rhythmic, melodic and harmonic examples.  Quizzes may be given in any class period without prior notice.  Material for these quizzes may be taken from the textbook, computer assignments, or outside sources.  Students also will be given assignments on the Aurelia software program.  As only one attempt will be allowed on each Aurelia quiz activity, students are encouraged to repeat all these exercises until they have mastered the skill.  Three Aurelia tests and five in class written tests, to include four unit tests plus the final exam, will be given according to the course schedule.

 

   VII.      Attendance/Participation Requirements:

According to the ETBU catalogue (p.21), “(t)o be eligible to earn credit in a course, the student must attend at least 75 percent of all class meetings.” The ninth absence, for any reason including but not limited to school activities, will result in failure of the class and loss of course credit.  Any student who fails to be seated in the classroom by the beginning of the class will be counted as tardy. Two tardies will be equivalent to one absence. Prior notification of any absence will be expected when possible. No course work missed due to absence will be made up unless prior arrangements have been made and the absence is the result of either a University approved event or other reason deemed acceptable by the instructor.

 

VIII.      Cell Phone Policy: As a courtesy to the instructor and the other students, please turn-off all cell-phones and other electronic paging devices before rehearsal. A student expecting an emergency call may leave his/her phone on silent (vibrate) if he/she has communicated with the instructor before the beginning of class. Any student whose cell-phone rings during class may be asked to leave.

 

      IX.      Grade Computation:

Tests:

            Ear Training             30%

            Sight Reading           30%

            Aurelia                       20%   

Assignments:                                   20%   

A=90-100

B=80-89

C=70-79

D=60-69

F=59 and below

 

 

         X.      Disability Statement: Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Advising Office in SCAR 104 and providing the required documentation.  If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations.  You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor. 

 

                       

 

MUSI 1117 Semester Schedule (Tentative)

 

January 12                Course Introduction / Distribution of Packets /Review

January 14-16           Review

 

Date

New Items Studied

 

Intervals / Tones

Harmony

Rhythm

January 19-23

7th

Major/Minor

sonorities

Triplet

Test 1 – January 23

January 26-30

 

Diminished/Augmented sonorities

 

February 2-6

Tritone

I, V (+ cadence)

Inversions

Duplet

Test 2 – February 6     Aurelia Test 1 Closed

February 9-13

 

IV (+ cadence)

Inversions

 

February 16-23

Passing Tone

Neighbor Tone

II

Inversions

Syncopation

Test 3 – February 23     Aurelia Test 2 Closed

February 25-27

Band Tour

Aurelia Assignment

March 2-6

Suspension

Retardation

VI (+ cadence)

Inversions

 

March 9-13

 

III

Inversions

 

Test 4 – March 13     Aurelia Test 3 Closed

March 16-20

Spring Break

March 23-27

 

VII

Inversions

 

March 30

 

 

 

April 1           

Final Exam

 

Examples in the Ottman text will be studied which support the above outline.

 

 
MUSI 1312Elementary Harmony II3MUSI 1312 Elementary Harmony II (3,0,3)
This course is a continuation of MUSI 1311 with the addition of secondary chords, the dominant seventh, the
supertonic seventh, modulation to the closely related keys, and harmonization of chorale melodies based on the
study of harmonies and non-harmonic devices as used in the chorales of J. S. Bach. Prerequisites: Music 1311

MUSI 1312.01 Elementary Harmony II
Spring 2009

Professor:  Dr. Randall Sulton

 

Office:  Jenna Guest, Room 108

 

Phone:  923-2164

 

Office Hours:  TBA; check the bulletin board outside my office

 

Email:    rsulton@etbu.edu

 

Course Data:  MWF 9-9:50; JGMB 138

 

Course Prerequisite

Musi 1311

Catalog Description

This course is a continuation of MUSI 1311 with the addition of secondary chords, the dominant seventh, the supertonic seventh, modulation to the closely related keys, and harmonization of chorale melodies based on the study of harmonies and non-harmonic devices as used in the chorales of J. S. Bach.  Prerequisite: MUSI 1311

Course Textbook(s)

Tonal Harmony , 6th ed.- Stefan Kostka, Dorothy Payne
Copyright - 2004
ISBN – 0-07-285260-7

Workbook for Tonal Harmony, 6th ed. - Stefan Kostka, Dorothy Payne
Copyright - 2004
ISBN – 0-07-285261-5

Course Objectives

1.     to be able to label and to notate all diatonic triads and seventh chords in all possible inversions 

2.     to be able to organize the above-mentioned chords into strong harmonic progressions based on the principles and part-writing examples found in the chorales of J. S. Bach 

3.     to be able to label all non-chord tones and to use them in part-writing exercises

4.     to be able to label and notate secondary dominants and secondary leading-tone chords

5.     to be able to recognize and label cadences, phrases, and periods                                

Evaluation and Grade Computation

Tests 70%           
Final comprehensive exam 30%    

 

OR

 

Tests 60%

Final comprehensive exam 40%

 

The computation that most benefits the student will be used in determining the semester grade.

 

 

Final Exam

The final exam will be given on Monday, April 27 from 10:30-12:20 pm in accordance with the University Spring 2009 Exam Schedule.                 

Attendance / Participation Requirements

See p. 21 of the 2007-8 ETBU Catalog. Attendance and homework assignments are critical components of this class.  Miss class at your own risk.  You are responsible for any material discussed or assignments made in class even in you are absent.  I begin my classes on time--I will not repeat myself for latecomers.

 

Disability Statement

Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Advising Office in SCAR 104 and providing the required documentation.   If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee, the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations.  You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor.    

Course Outline / Material to be Covered

Tentative Schedule

 

1/12-23  Ch. 7     

1/26        Test 1

1/28- 2/4                Ch. 8, 9

2/6          Test 2

2/9-13    Ch. 11, 12

2/16        Test 3

2/18-25  Ch. 13-15

2/27        Test 4

3/2-25    Ch. 16

3/27        Test 5

3/30- 4/8                Ch. 17

4/13        Test 6

4/15-22  Ch. 10

4/24        Test  7

4/27        Final Exam at 10:30-12:20

 

 
MUSI 2116Advanced Ear Training I1MUSI 2116 Advanced Ear Training I (1,0,1)
Development of advanced sight singing ability and aural acuity relative to intervals, chords, and rhythms is
experienced in Advanced Ear Training I. This class meets two hours per week. Prerequisites: MUSI 1117.

MUSI 2116 – Advanced Ear Training I

MWF 9:00-9:50 a.m.

JGMB 147

Fall 2008

 

Dr. Douglas Lockard                                                                        Redwine 106, Ext 2167

dlockard@etbu.edu                                                                                                            Office hours as posted

 

 

I.      Course Description: Development of advanced sight singing and aural acuity relative to intervals, chords, and rhythms is experienced in Advanced Ear Training I. This class meets three hours per week for ten weeks.

 

II.      Prerequisites:  MUSI 1117.

 

III.      Curriculum requirement:  BM – Sacred Music Major, Vocal Performance Major, Piano Performance Major, All-Level Music Education Major; BA – Music Major.

 

IV.      Textbooks (required): Music for Sight Singing, 7th ed. by Ottman and Rogers

Ear Training: A Technique for Listening, 7th ed. By Benward and Kolosick

 

V.      Objectives:

·         To demonstrate reliable singing and music reading using folk, western, and nonwestern classical music;

·         To notate chromatic and modulating melodies, challenging rhythms and harmonic progressions;

·         To accurately identify harmonic intervals and chord functions;

·         To detect melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic errors;

·         To develop the ability to use solfege syllables  

VI.      Assignments:

1. Sight Singing (Performance):  Activities will be given in class to develop the ability to read rhythms and pitches accurately.  Quizzes may be given in any class period without prior notice.  Material for these quizzes will be taken from the textbook, computer assignments, and outside sources.  Four tests will be given during the semester according to the course schedule found on the Student Toolbox.

 

2. Ear Training (Written):  Class activities will be used to develop these skills.  Students will also be given practice assignments on the Aurelia software program.  Four written tests will be given during the semester according to the course schedule found on the Student Toolbox.

 

VII.      Attendance/Participation Requirements:

According to the ETBU catalogue (p.21), “(t)o be eligible to earn credit in a course, the student must attend at least 75 percent of all class meetings.” The eighth absence will result in failure of the class and loss of course credit. Any student who fails to be seated in the classroom by the beginning of the class will be counted as tardy. Three tardies will be equivalent to one absence. It is this instructor’s policy that two non-university/instructor approved absences will lower the student’s final grade by one letter, four non-university/instructor approved absences will lower the student’s final grade by two letters, and six non-university/instructor approved absences will lower the student’s final grade by three letters. Instructor approved absences will include a death in the family or the student’s doctor certified illness. All absences count when calculating credit for a course. No course work missed due to absence will be made up unless prior arrangements have been made and the absence is the result of a university/instructor approved event.

 

·         Grade Computation:

Quizzes:                                     35%                

Tests:                                          35%                

Assignments:                              15%                

Final Exam:                                15%                

              

A=90-100

B=80-89

C=70-79

D=60-69

F=59 and below

 

 

 

VII.     Disability Accommodation Statement:

Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Advising Office in SCAR 104 and providing the required documentation.  If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations.  You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor.

 


 

Advanced Ear Training I – Fall 2008

 

Course Schedule (Approximate)

August 25                         Course Introduction; Review of Unit 7

                  August 27                         Unit 8

                  August 29                         Unit 8

                  September 1                      Unit 8

                  September 3                      Unit 8

                  September 5                      Sight Singing Test 1

                  September 8                      Ear Training Test 1 

                  September 10                    Unit 9

                  September 12                    Unit 9

                  September 15                    Unit 9

                  September 17                    Unit 9

                  September 19                    Ear Training Test 2

                  September 22                    Sight Singing Test 2

                  September 24                    Unit 10

                  September 26                    Unit 10

                  September 29                    Unit 10

                  October 1                          Unit 10

                  October 3                          Unit 10

                  October 6                          Unit 10           

                  October 8                          Ear Training Test 3

                  October 10                                    Sight Singing Test 3

                  October 13                                    Unit 11

                  October 15                                    Unit 11

                  October 17                                    Unit 11

                  October 20                                    Unit 11

                  October 22                                    Unit 11

                  October 24                                    Unit 11           

                  October 27                                    Ear Training Test 4

                  October 29                                    Sight Singing Test 4

 

                  Final Exam – Monday, November 3, 2008; 9:00 a.m.

 

A student who wishes to improve his/her final grade may elect to attend class following the Nov. 3 final exam. Additional class and Aurelia assignments will be completed and a second final exam will be given on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 8:00-9:50 a.m.

 
MUSI 2312Advanced Harmony3

MUSI 2312 Advanced Harmony (3,0,3)
Through extensive analysis and part-writing exercises, this course examines the altered and chromatic harmonies
of the common practice period through the late 19th century. Prerequisite: MUSI 1312.

 

MUSI 2312.01 Advanced Harmony
Fall 2008

Professor:  Dr. Randall Sulton

 

Office:  Jenna Guest, Room 108

 

Phone:  923-2164

 

Office Hours:  TBA; check the bulletin board outside my office

 

Email:    rsulton@etbu.edu

 

Course Data:  MWF 11-11:50; JGMB 136

 

Course Prerequisite

MUSI 1312

Catalog Description

Through extensive analysis and part-writing exercises, this course examines the altered and chromatic harmonies of the common practice period through the late 19th century.

Course Textbook(s)

Tonal Harmony , 5th ed.- Stefan Kostka, Dorothy Payne
Copyright - 2004
ISBN – 0-07-285260-7

Workbook for Tonal Harmony, 5th ed. - Stefan Kostka, Dorothy Payne
Copyright - 2004
ISBN – 0-07-285261-5

Course Objectives

1. to be able to analyze music of the common practice era (through the late 19th century) 

2. to be able to apply correct part writing in the use of borrowed chords, Neapolitan chords, augmented-sixth chords, altered dominants, and expanded tertian sonorities (9th, 11th, 13th chords)


 

Grade Computation

Tests 70%                                                             AND       Tests 60%           
Final comprehensive exam 30%                                     Final comprehensive exam 40%

 

The computation that most benefits the student will be used in determining the semester grade.

Final Exam

The final exam will be given on Monday, December 8th, from 10:30-12:20 pm in accordance with the University Fall 2008 Exam Schedule.                 

 

 

Attendance / Participation Requirements

See p. 21 of the 2008-9 ETBU Catalog. Attendance and homework assignments are critical components of this class.  Miss class at your own risk.  You are responsible for any material discussed or assignments made in class even if you are absent.  I begin my classes on time--I will not repeat myself for latecomers.

 

Disability Statement

Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Advising Office in SCAR 104 and providing the required documentation.   If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee, the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations.  You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor.    

Course Outline / Material to be covered

Tentative Schedule

 

Daily readings and/or exercises will be assigned from the text and /or workbook.


8/25 Review Secondary dominants Ch. 16
8/27-9/1 More secondary functions Ch. 17
9/3 Test on secondary functions
9/5-9/12 Modulation Ch. 18
9/15 Test on Ch. 18
9/17-22 Ch. 19 More Modulation
9/24 Test on Ch. 19
9/26-10/3 Ch. 21 Mode mixture
10/6 Test on Ch. 21
10/8-10 Ch. 22 Neapolitan chord
10/13 Test on Ch. 22
10/15-24 Ch. 23 Augmented sixth chords
10/27 Test on Ch. 23

10/29-11/5 Ch. 24 More augmented sixth chords

11/7 Test on Ch. 24

11/10-11/14 Ch. 25 Enharmonic spellings and modulations
11/17 Test on Ch. 25
11/19-21 Ch. 26 Further elements of harmonic vocabulary
11/24-28 Thanksgiving Holidays

12/1-3 Continue Ch. 26
12/5 Test on Ch. 26
12/8 Comprehensive Final Exam:  Monday, 10:30-12:20 pm

 

 

 
MUSI 2117Advanced Ear Training II1MUSI 2117 Advanced Ear Training II (1,0,1)
This is an extension of MUSI 2116 in the development of advanced sight singing and ear training ability.
Advanced Ear Training II meets two hours each week. The student must make application for a degree plan
to avoid a grade of “I” (Incomplete) and to avoid losing music scholarships. Prerequisites: MUSI 2116 and
2312.

MUSI 2117.01 – Advanced Ear Training II

MWF 9:00-9:50 a.m.

JGMB 147

Spring 2009

 

Dr. Douglas Lockard                                                                        Redwine 106, Ext 2167

dlockard@etbu.edu                                                                                                            Office hours as posted

 

 

                   I.Course Description: This course is an extension of MUSI 2116 in the development of advanced sight singing and ear training ability.  Advanced Ear Training II meets three hours each week for ten weeks.     

          II.      Prerequisites:  MUSI 2116 and 2312.

 

       III.      Curriculum requirement:  BM – Sacred Music Major, Vocal Performance Major, Piano Performance Major, All-Level Music Education Major; BA – Music Major.

 

        IV.      Textbook (required): Music for Sight Singing, 7th ed. by Ottman and Rogers

Ear Training: A Technique for Listening, 7th ed. By Benward and Kolosick

 

           V.      Objectives:

·         To demonstrate reliable singing and music reading using folk, western, and nonwestern classical music;

·         To notate chromatic and modulating melodies, challenging rhythms and harmonic progressions;

·         To accurately identify harmonic intervals and chord functions;

·         To detect melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic errors;

·         To develop the ability to use solfege syllables  

 

     VII.      Assignments:

1. Sight Singing (Performance):  Activities will be given in class to develop the ability to read rhythms and pitches accurately.  Quizzes may be given in any class period without prior notice.  Material for these quizzes will be taken from the textbook, computer assignments, and outside sources.  Five tests will be given during the semester according to the course schedule found on the syllabus.

 

2. Ear Training (Written):  Class activities will be used to develop these skills.  Students will also be given practice assignments on the Auralia software program. Five written tests will be given during the semester according to the course schedule found on the syllabus.

   

  VIII.      Attendance/Participation Requirements:

According to the ETBU catalogue (p.21), “(t)o be eligible to earn credit in a course, the student must attend at least 75 percent of all class meetings.” The eighth absence will result in failure of the class and loss of course credit. Any student who fails to be seated in the classroom by the beginning of the class will be counted as tardy. Three tardies will be equivalent to one absence. It is this instructor’s policy that two non-university/instructor approved absences will lower the student’s final grade by one letter, four non-university/instructor approved absences will lower the student’s final grade by two letters, and six non-university/instructor approved absences will lower the student’s final grade by three letters. Instructor approved absences will include a death in the family or the student’s doctor certified illness. All absences count when calculating credit for a course. No course work missed due to absence will be made up unless prior arrangements have been made and the absence is the result of a university/instructor approved event.

 

 

        IX.      Grade Computation:

Quizzes:                                     35%                

Tests:                                          35%                

Assignments:                              15%                

Final Exam:                                15%                

              

A=90-100

B=80-89

C=70-79

D=60-69

F=59 and below

 

 

 

XI.       Disability Accommodation Statement:

Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Advising Office in SCAR 104 and providing the required documentation.  If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations.  You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor.


 

Advanced Ear Training II – Spring 2009

 

VIII. Course Schedule (Approximate)

January 12                         Review of Unit 11

                  January 14                         Unit 12

                  January 16                         Unit 12

                  January 19                         Unit 12

                  January 21                         Unit 12

                  January 23                         Sight Singing Test 1

                  January 26                         Ear Training Test 1 

                  January 28                         Unit 13

                  January 30                         Unit 13

                  Feb. 2                                Unit 13

                  Feb. 4                                Unit 13

                  Feb. 6                                Sight Singing Test 2

                  Feb. 9                                Ear Training Test 2

                  Feb. 11-13                         NO CLASS--TMEA  

                  Feb. 16                              Unit 14

                  Feb. 18                              Unit 14

                  Feb. 20                              Unit 14

                  Feb. 23                              Unit 14

                  Feb.25                               Auralia Assignment/Band Tour

                  Feb. 27                              Auralia Assignment/Band Tour

                  March 2                             Unit 14           

                  March 4                             Ear Training Test 3

                  March 6                             Sight Singing Test 3                         

                  March 9                             Unit 15

                  March 11                           Unit 15

                  March 13                           Unit 15                                              

                  March 16-20                     Spring Break                         

                  March 23                           Unit 15           

                  March 25                           Unit 15

                  March 27                           Sight Singing Test 4

                  March 30                           Ear Training Test 4

                   

                  Final Exam – Wednesday, April 1, 9:00-9:50

 

A student wishing to improve his/her final grade may elect to attend class following the April 1 final exam.  Additional class and Auralia assignments will be completed and a second final exam will be administered on Wednesday, April 29, 8:00-9:50 a.m. in JGMB 147.

 

 
MUSI 3303Form and Analysis3MUSI 3303 Form and Analysis (3,0,3)
This course is an introduction to the principle formal structures and processes of the 18th and 19th centuries,
including fugue, binary, ternary, rondo, variation, and sonata forms. Prerequisite: MUSI 2312.

 

MUSI 3303 Form and Analysis

Spring 2009

Instructor:

Dr. Thomas R. Webster

            Office: JGMB 102                   

            Phone:  923-2158                      

            Email:   twebster@etbu.edu           

            Office Hours:    MWF: 9:00-10:00; 11:00-12:00; 2:00-3:00

                                    T:  8:00-9:00

                                    R:  8:00-9:00; 2:00-3:00

 

Course Information

Description:  This course is an introduction to the principle formal structures and processes of the 18th and 19th centuries, including fugue, binary, ternary, rondo, variation, and sonata forms.  Prerequisite:  MUSI 2312.  

           

            Prerequisite:  MUSI 2312 Advanced Harmony

 

Curriculum requirement:  This course is a basic musicianship requirement on all ETBU music major programs.

 

Textbooks:    

            Tonal Harmony, 6th ed., Stefan Kostka and Dorothy Payne

This text is required in MUSI 1311, 1312, and 2312, all prerequisites for this course.  We will use only one chapter (Chapter 10) from this text as introductory material.  Students should already have this textbook and the supplementary workbook from previous courses.  Students who transfer credits for those courses to ETBU from another institution and do not have this book are not expected to purchase it.

 

Lessons in Music Form, Percy Goetschius

NOTE: The Goetschius text is out of print, but is available by permission of the publisher on Toolbox and at the following website: Project Gutenberg: Online Book Reader (http://www.gutenberg.org/catalog/world/readfile?fk_files=255586&pageno=1)

 

Anthology of Musical Analysis, 6th Edition, Charles Burkhart. (not required)

Electronic Resources (primarily “ebrary”) are available through the Jarrett Library.  These resources will be used extensively.  Students are encouraged to purchase the anthology listed above, however, the works to be used are available through the University Library.

 


 

Course Objectives: 

·         To further develop an understanding of the common elements and organizational patterns of music and their interaction, and the ability to employ this understanding in aural and visual analysis;

·         To acquire sufficient understanding of musical forms, processes, and structures to use this knowledge in compositional, performance, scholarly, pedagogical, and historical contexts, according to the requisites of their specializations;

·         To acquire the ability to place music in historical and stylistic contexts;

 

Also:

·         While synthesis is a lifetime process, by the end of undergraduate study students must be able to work on musical problems by combining, as appropriate to the issue, their capabilities in performance; aural, verbal, and visual analysis; composition and improvisation; history and repertory; and technology.

 

Assignments and Quizzes:

Reading and analysis assignments will be made for each class period.  Though these assignments will not be collected and graded, they will be used for class discussion and elaboration.  Students who attend class without their required resources and completed homework will not be prepared to participate in the class discussion and activities, and thus will benefit minimally from the discussion.  If it becomes necessary, the professor may choose to implement quizzes at the beginning of class to encourage improved class preparation and promptness.  In this case, all quizzes will be averaged together to account for one additional test grade.

 

Periodically the instructor will provide written evaluations of each student’s class participation and preparation grade.  This evaluation may be sent in the form of an email, a letter or note distributed in class, or a note written on a graded test or quiz.  Students are welcome to discuss this grade with the instructor at any time during the semester.  Students who attend class consistently, arrive on time, provide evidence that the reading assignments have been completed, complete written analysis assignments, and ask thoughtful questions regarding the material will receive a desirable “Preparation and Participation” grade. 

 

Assignments will be primarily of two types: 1) written responses to the questions in the text, and 2) analysis of music examples.  The written responses to the questions in the text should reflect the language used in the text.  The student may choose to add additional information in their own words to aid the their comprehension of the material.  The student may not seek outside sources to answer the question in an effort to avoid reading the textbook.  The analysis assignments will be taken primarily from the required anthology.  These examples allow the student to make practical application of the course objectives.  Students may choose to work in small groups to complete the assignments of both types. However, group work that allows students to complete assignments without understanding material is counterproductive and will only lead to a poor performance on in-class quizzes and tests. 

 

Tests:

Tests will focus primarily on the unit or chapters studied since the previous test, however, as is the nature of this discipline, the tests will require students to understand and successfully process the material covered throughout the course and including all prerequisite courses (MUSI 1311, 1312, 2312).

 


 

Final Exam:

The final exam for the course will be administered on Thursday, April 30, 2009 from 9:30-11:20.  Students may not request permission to take the exam earlier in order to facilitate an earlier departure from campus.  No reasons other than an unavoidable emergency will be acceptable for the purposes of making up the final exam.

 

Evaluation and Grade Computation:

Daily class preparation and participation  25%                

Tests                                                                50%                
Final exam                                                         25%     

           

A=90-100         B=80-89           C=70-79           D=60-69          F=0-59

 

Attendance/Participation Requirements: 

The nature of this course requires students to complete various types (reading, analysis, etc) of homework assignments and come to class prepared to discuss their work.  Missing class will be a tremendous detriment to the students understanding of the subject and success on the tests and final exam.  Thus, students are expected to attend every class, and to inform the professor if they need to miss for any reason.  Students may make up tests only when advance notice of the absence is given to the professor and when the professor deems the reason to be acceptable.  Students must make arrangements to make up quizzes and tests prior to any absence, even when that absence is approved by the University Office of Academic Affairs.  If a student has an emergency that prevents him/her from providing advance notice of an absence, the professor will consider those circumstances after the fact.  Students are responsible for any material discussed or assignments made in class.

 

In accordance with ETBU policy, “the student must attend at least 75% of all class meetings” (ETBU Academic Catalog, p. 21). Any student whose absences exceeds 75% (e.g. more than 7 absences for this course) will receive a failing course grade. Three tardies count as one absence.

 

In addition to the attendance and participation requirements listed above, students are expected to behave in manner that is not disruptive to the class.  While a student may choose not to participate or perhaps even sleep during class, such behavior typically does not hinder the educational opportunities of anyone other than that student.  However, behavior such as talking during class, arriving late, leaving early, or leaving during class to take care of personal business is very disruptive to the instructor and other students in the class.  This behavior will not be tolerated, and students who demonstrate this manner of behavior will be addressed privately by the instructor, and the participation grade will be negatively affected.  If the problem persists after the instructor has addressed the situation, then the instructor will ask the student to leave the class and make an official report to the Dean of Students. 

 

All cell phones should be turned off during class, and students will not be allowed to use cell phones during any class session.  Students will not be allowed to leave the class during the administration of a quiz or test. 

 


 

Academic Misconduct:

Any and all students engaging in academic misconduct will receive a failing grade on the exam in question, and the case may be referred to the Dean of Students for appropriate disciplinary action.

 

 

Tentative Course Outline

 

NOTE:  This schedule may change as needed throughout the semester.  Any changes to the test dates will be discussed in class, and students will be given sufficient notice of any exam.

                        

Jan 13-20          Course Introduction – Syllabus Review

                       

UNIT I: Fundamental Elements

                        Chapter 10: Cadences, Phrases and Periods (Kostka/Payne)

                                    Cadences

                                    Cadences and Harmonic Rhythm

\                                  Motives and Phrases

                                    Period Forms

                                    The Sentence

                        ASSIGNMENT:

                                    Checkpoint (page 160)

                                    Self-Test 10-1

                                    Exercise 10-1 (workbook)

 

                        Chapter I: Introduction (Goetschius)

                                    The Necessity of Form in Music

                                    The Evidences of Form in Music

                                    Unity and Variety          

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 1 (LiMF, pg. 10)

Jan 22            TEST 1

 

UNIT II: BINARY STRUCTURES

Jan 27-Feb 5    Chapter IX: The Two-Part Song-Form

                                    The Song-form or Part-form

                                    The Parts

                                    The First Part

                                    The Second Part

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 9

                                    Sonata; Beethoven

                                                Op. 57, Andante, Theme

                                                Op. 109, Andante, Theme

                                                Op. 111, last movement, Theme of Variations

                                                Op. 79, Andante, ms 1-8

                                                            Last movement, ms 1-16

                                                Op. 54, ms 1-24 (each Part repeated)

                                                Op. 31, No. 3, Menuetto (without Trio)

                                                Op. 26, “Trio” of Scherzo

                                                            Last movement, ms 1-28 (second part repeated)

                                                Op. 27, No. 2, “Trio” of Allegretto

                                    Sonata, No. 2, Andante, ms 1-20, 21-40; Mozart

                                    Schuman, Op 68, Nos. 7, 4, 35, 42, 23 (repeated; last 16 ½ measures, coda)

                                    Ach Gott und Herr, Chorale (pg.609)

                                    Symphony No. 101; Haydn

                                                III, Trio only

                                                Finale, mm. 1-28           

                                    Sonata, Op. 2. No. 1; Beethoven

                                                Menuetto only  

                                                Trio only

                                    Album for the Young; Schumann

                                                Nos. 1, 6

                                    Prelude No. 20; Chopin

                                    Symphony No. 100 (“Military”), III Trio only; Haydn

Feb 10        TEST 2

 

UNIT III: Ternary Structures

Feb 10-19         Chapter X: The Three-Part Song-Form

                                    Distinction between Bipartite and Tripartite Forms

                                    Part I

                                    Part II

                                    Part III

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 10

                                    Song Without Words, Mendelssohn

                                                Nos. 22, 35, 32, 45, 42, 31, 27, 46, 25, 20, 26, 36, 47, 12, 15, 3, 43,                                                             40, 37, 2, 33, 30, 1

                                    Schumann, Op. 68

                                                Nos. 3, 8, 12, 14, 16, 17, 21, 24, 25, 26, 28, 29, 33, 34, 37, 38, 40, 41

                                    Sonatas, Beethoven

                                                Op. 2, No. 1, III, both Menuetto and Trio

                                                Op. 2, No. 2, III, both Scherzo and Trio

                                                Op. 2, No. 2, last movement, ms 1-16 (see notes in text)

                                                Op. 7, Largo, ms 1-24

                                                            III, also the Minore

                                                            Last movement, ms 1-38

                                                Op. 10, No. 3, Menuetto

                                                Op. 14, No. 1, III; also the Maggiore

                                                Op. 14, No. 2, II, ms 1-20

                                                Op. 22, Menuetto; also the Minore

                                                Op. 26, ms 1-34

                                                            Scherzo

                                                            Funeral March (also the Trio, what is its form?)

                                    Sonatas, Mozart

                                                No. 15, Andante, ms 1-32

                                                No. 1, last movement, ms 1-50

                                                No. 12, ms 1-18

                                                            II, Trio (see notes in text)

                                                No. 13, Adagio, ms 1-16

                                    Mazurkas, Chopin

                                                Nos. 11, 22, 24, 40, 49

                                    Mendelssohn, Op. 72

                                                Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 6

                                    Mendelssohn, Etudes, Op. 104

                                                Nos. 1, 3

                                    Schumann, Op. 68

                                                No. 32 (see notes in text)

                                                Nos. 8, 9, 11; ms 1-24 (see notes in text)

 

                        Chapter XI: Enlargement of the Three-Part Song-Form

                                    Repetition of the Parts

                                    Exact Repetitions

                                    Modified Repetitions

                                    The Five-part Forms

                                    Group of Parts

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 11

                                    Song Without Words, Mendelssohn

                                                Nos. 3, 4, 8, 10, 11, 12, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 24, 27, 31, 34, 39, 43, 44,                                                            46,

                                    Schumann, Op. 68

                                                Nos, 5, 6, 10, 13, 15, 19, 22, 30, 36, 43

                                    Mendelssohn, Op. 72, No. 5

                                    Chopin, Prelude, Op. 28, No. 17

                                    Mozart, Sonata, No. 8, Andante

                                    Mozart, No. 18, Andantino (of the “Fantasia”)

                                    Mazurkas, Chopin

                                                Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 15, 16, 18, 37, 44, 48

                                    Mazurkas, Chopin (see notes in text)

                                                Nos. 7, 14, 19, 20, 21, 27, 34, 39, 41,

                                    Momens musicals, Op. 94, No. 3; Schubert

 

Feb 19-Mar 3   Chapter XII: The Song-Form with Trio

                                    The Principal Song

                                    The “Trio” or Subordinate Song

                                    The “Da Capo”

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 12

                                    Sonatas, Beethoven

                                                Op. 2, No. 1, III Menuetto and Trio (see notes in text)

                                                Op. 2, No. 2, Scherzo and Trio

                                                Op. 2, No. 3, Scherzo and Trio

                                                Op. 7, III, Allegro and Minore

                                                Op. 10, No. 2, II, Allegretto (see notes in text)

                                                Op. 10, No. 3, Menuetto and Trio

                                                Op. 14, No. 1, II, Allegretto and Maggiore; a coda is added

                                                Op. 22, Menuetto and Minore

                                                Op. 26, Scherzo, and Trio

                                                Op. 27, No. 1, II Allegro molto (see notes in text)

                                                Op. 27, No. 2, Allegretto and Trio

                                                Op. 28, Scherzo and Trio

                                                Op. 31, No. 3, Menuetto and Trio

                                    Schumann, Op. 68, No. 11 (see notes in text)

                                                Nos. 12, 29, 39, 37 (see notes in text)

                                    Sonatas, Mozart

                                                No. 2, Andante cantabile (see notes in text)

                                                No. 9, II Menuettos (see notes in text)

                                                No. 12, Menuetto

                                    Momens musicals, Op 94, Nos. 1-4 and 6; Schubert

                                    Schumann, Op. 82 (Waldscenen)

                                                Nos. 7 and 8

                                    Mazurkas, Chopin

                                                Nos. 6, 12, 23, 47, 50

                                                Nos. 10, 45, 46, 51 (see notes in text)

Mar 5                        TEST 3

 

UNIT IV: RONDO FORMS

Mar 10-24         Chapter XIII: The First Rondo-Form

                                    Evolution

                                    The Rondo-forms

                                    The First Rondo-form

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 13

                                    Sonatas, Beethoven

                                                Op. 2, No. 1, Adagio

                                                Op. 7, Largo

                                                Op. 2, No. 3, Adagio

                                                Op. 79, Andante

                                                Op. 27, No. 1, Allegro molto

                                    Impromptus, Schubert

                                                Op. 90, Nos. 2 and 3

                                    Mazurka, No. 26; Chopin

                                    Nocturnes, Chopin

                                                Op. 27, No. 1

                                                Op. 32, No. 2

                                                Op. 37, No. 1

                                                Op. 48, No. 1 and No. 2

                                                Op. 55, No. 1

                                                Op. 62, No. 1

                                                Op. 72, No. 1 (E minor, posthumous)

 

                        Chapter XIV: The Second Rondo-Form

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 14

                                    Sonatas, Beethoven

                                                Op. 10, No. 3, last movement

                                                Op. 14, No. 2, last movement (Scherzo)

                                                Op. 79, last movement (very concise)

                                                Op. 13, Adagio (still more concise – not a Five-Part Song-Form)

                                    Polonaise, Op. 89, Beethoven

                                    Rondo in A minor; Mozart

 

                        Chapter XV: The Third Rondo-Form

                                    The Exposition

                                    The Middle Division

                                    The Recapitulation

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 15

                                    Sonatas, Beethoven

                                                Op. 26, last movement (very concise, not a perfect model)

                                                Op. 28, last movement

                                                Op. 7, last movement

                                                Op. 2, No. 3, last movement

                                                Op. 13, last movement

                                                Op. 22, last movement

                                                Op. 14, No. 1, last movement

                                                Op. 31, No. 1, Adagio

                                    Rondos, Beethoven

                                                Op. 51, No. 1

                                                Op. 51, No. 2

                                    Sonata, Mozart

                                                No. 4, last movement

                                                No. 3, last movement

Mar 26        TEST 4

 

UNIT V: SONATA FORMS

Mar 26-Apr 14  Chapter XVI: The Sonatine Form

                                    Classification of the Larger Form

                                    The Sonatine Form

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 16

                                    Sonatas, Beethoven

                                                        Op. 10, No. 1, Adagio

                                                Op. 31, No. 2, Adagio

                                    Andante cantabile in B-flat major; Mendelssohn

                                    Sonata, No. 17, Andante amoroso; Mozart (somewhat longer interlude)

                                    Presto agitato in B minor, Mendelssohn (see notes in text)

 

                        Chapter XVII: The Sonata Form

                                    Origin of the Name

                                    The Sonata Form

                                    The Exposition

                                    The Development, or Middle Division

                                    The Recapitulation

                                    Dissolution

                                    Relation to the Three-Part Song-form

                        ASSIGNMENT: Lesson 17

                                    Sonatas, Beethoven

                                                Op. 2, No. 1 in F Minor, first movement (see notes)

                                                Op. 2, No. 2, first movement

                                                Op. 10, No. 3, Largo

                                                Op. 22, first movement (four or five codettas)

                                                Op. 14, No. 1, first movement

                                                Op. 22, Adagio

                                                Op. 27, No. 2, last movement

                                                Op. 28, first movement

                                                Op. 31, No. 1, first movement

                                                Op. 31, No. 2, first movement

                                                Op. 31, No. 3, first movement (see notes in text)

                                                            Scherzo

                                                Op. 31, No. 2, last movement (see notes in text)

                                                Op. 78, first movement (diminutive)

                                                Op. 79, first movement

                                                Op. 90, first movement, (no “double bar”)

                                                Op. 57, first movement

                                                            Last movement

                                    Sonatas, Mozart

                                                No. 7, first movement

                                                No. 3, first movement

                                                No. 4, first movement; also Andante

                                                No. 8, first movement

                                                No. 6, first movement

                                                No. 1, Andante

                                                No. 6, last movement

                                                K.333,I, and II Andante cantabile

                                    Caprice, Op. 33, No. 2, Mendelssohn

                                    Sonatas, Mendelssohn

                                                Op. 6, first movement

                                                Op. 7, No. 7

                                    Fantasia, Op. 28, last movement

                                    Sonatas, Schubert

                                                Op. 143, first movement

                                                Op. 42, first movement

                                                Op. 120, first movement

                                                Op. 147, first movement

                                                Op. 164, first movement

                                    Beethoven

                                                Symphony, No. 5, first movement

                                                Symphony, No. 1, first Allegro; also second movement; Finale

Apr 14         TEST 5

 

UNIT VI: Imitative Procedures

April 14-23       Fugue and Related Genres

                                    Fugue and Form

                                    Characteristics of Fugue

                                    The Fugue Subject and Answer

                                    Contrapuntal Devices

                                    Fugal Procedure

                                    The Form of a Fugue

                                    The Invention

                        ASSIGNMENT

                                    Bach, Fugue No. 1 from WTC, mm. 14-20

                                    Bach, Fugue No. 2 from WTC

                                    Bach,  Fugue No. 8 from WTC, mm. 77-82

                                    Bach, Fugue No. 13 in F# Major

                                    Bach, Invention No. 1, 15

April 23      TEST 6

 

Final Exam:         Thursday, April 30, 9:30-11:20 A.M.

           

Disability Accommodation Statement

Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Advising Office in SCAR 104 and providing the required documentation.  If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations.  You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor.                          

 

 
MUSI 320320th Century Analytical Techniques2MUSI 3203 20th Century Music Analytical Techniques (2,0,2)
This course provides the student with the necessary language and techniques for analyzing a range of 20th
Century musical styles, from Impressionism to nonserial atonality, serialism, and integral serialism. Analysis
is supported by the writing of short compositions reflecting specific compositional styles. Prerequisite:
MUSI 3303.

MUSI 3203.01

20th Century Music Analytical Techniques

Fall 2008

 

Professor: Robert S. Wright

Office: JGMB Room 114

Phone: (903) 923-2166

Office Hours: TBA; check the bulletin board outside the music lab

Email: rwright@etbu.edu

Course Data: TR 9:30-10:20 AM; JGMB 136

 

Course Prerequisite: MUSI 3303

 

Course Description:

This course provides students with the necessary language and techniques for analyzing a variety of 20th century musical styles, including Impressionism, post romanticism, neo-classicism, non-serial atonality,  serialism,  integral serialism, minimalism, electronic media, and aleatoric procedures.

 

Required Texts:

1.       Materials and Techniques of Twentieth-Century Music, Third Edition, by Stefan Kostka. 2006.  ISBN 0-13-193080-X

2.      Anthology of Music for Analysis, by Stefan Kostka and Roger Graybill.  2004.  ISBN 0-13-091544-0

Course Objectives:

1.       Be able to analyze a wide variety of 20th Century music styles.

2.      Be able to compose short works in 20th Century style reflecting a clear knowledge of specified styles and techniques.

3.      Be aware and knowledgeable of major theoretical tools and methods used to analyze non-tonal music.

4.      Be able to integrate such analytical skills into thoughtful and sensitive performances of 20th Century music.

 

Grade Computation:

Chapter Quizzes (4), Listening Quizzes (4), and Daily assignments – 60%

Take Home Analyses (2) – 15%

Final exam: 20th Century Composition – 25%

 

Attendance:

See page 21 of the 2008-2009 ETBU Catalog.  To be eligible to earn credit in this course, each student must attend at least 75 percent of all class meetings. Class will begin promptly at 9:30 – information conveyed at the beginning of class time will not be repeated for latecomers.

 

Final Exam:

Thursday, December 11, 9:30 – 11:20 AM.  Instead of a final exam, a 20th century composition project will be completed.  The composition may be patterned after any of the styles studied this semester.  During the exam time, these compositions will be performed in the recital hall.  Students are responsible for acquiring performers for the realization of their composition.

 

Disability Statement:

Students with a disability may request appropriate accommodations for this course by contacting the Advising Office in SCAR 104 and providing the required documentation.  If accommodations are approved by the Disability Accommodations Committee, the Advising Office will notify you and your professor of the approved accommodations.  You must then discuss these accommodations with your professor.

 

Tentative Course Outline:

8/26 – Course Outline; Chapter 1, The Twilight of the Tonal System

8/28 – Continue study of Chapter 1; Review quiz due; Overtone quiz

9/2 – Chapter 2, Scale Formations in 20th Century Music

9/4 – Continue study of Chapter 2; Listening quiz #1

9/9 – Continue study of Chapter 2; Take home scale quiz

9/11 – Chapter 3, The Vertical Dimension

9/16 – Continue study of Chapter 3; take home chord quiz due

9/18 – Quiz on Chapters 1-3

9/23 – Chapter 4, The Horizontal Dimension

9/25 – Harmonic Progression and Tonality; Listening quiz #2

9/30 – Continue study of Chapter 5

10/2 – Chapter 6, Developments in Rhythm

10/7 – Continue study of Chapter 6

10/9 – Quiz on Chapters 4-6

10/14 – Analyses of selected 20th century music

10/16 – Continued analyses of selected 20th century music

10/21 – Take home analysis due; begin working on 20th century composition

10/23 – Chapter 9, Non-serial Atonality; listening quiz #3

10/28 – Continued study of Chapter 9

10/30 – Quiz on chapter 9

11/4 – Chapter 10, Classical Serialism

11/6 – Continued study of Chapter 10

11/11 – Analysis of 12-tone composition due

11/13 – Chapters 11 & 12, Timbre and Texture: Acoustic and Electronic

11/18 – Chapter 13, Serialism after 1945; Listening quiz #4

11/20 – Chapter 14, The Roles of Chance and Choice in 20th Century Music

12/2 – Chapter 15, Minimalism and Beyond

12/4 – Work on compositions

Final Exam – Thursday, December 11, 9:30 – 11:20 AM; 20th century compositions due

 

 
   Note:  MUSI 3306 (Orchestration) is marked as recommended (3 hours) but perhaps not required?

MUSI 3306 Orchestration (3,0,3)
Practical experience in arranging music compositions for the orchestra is gained from this course.
Accompaniments for solo voices and/or instruments will be arranged to acquaint students with the tone colors
of the orchestra. Some choral arranging will also be included. Prerequisite: MUSI 2312.

 
 Total18  
     

Hardin-Simmons University

http://www.hsutx.edu/academics/music/index.html

http://www.hsutx.edu/academics/music/NewFiles/Bachelor%20of%20Music%20EducChoral.pdf

http://www.hsutx.edu/Media/Website%20Resources/pdf/registrar/08-09Catalog.pdf

 

http://www.hsutx.edu/academics/music/bscherr/courses.htm

 

Req theory course

Title

Credit hours

Description

From the Website: http://www.hsutx.edu/academics/music/bscherr/MUTC_1235a.htm, the following more specific information is included in class syllabi

 
MUTC 1331Funcamentals of Music Look up the official catalog description to go first

Dr. Charles Coltman Syllabus

Course Structure

This course is intended to familiarize students with the harmonic, melodic and rhythmic structure of music. Students will understand the fundamental elements of music and be able to apply them in real-world musical situations.

Course Materials

Fundamentals of Music, 5th ed. by Earl Henry

Daily grades

30%

Midterm

30%

Final

30%

Participation

10%

Week 1

The Notation of Rhythm

Reading: Chapter 1 (pp. 1-24)

Week 2

The Notation of Pitch

Reading: Chapter 2 (pp. 25-44)

Week 3

The Keyboard

Reading: Chapter 3 (pp. 45-66)

Week 4

Simple Meters

Reading: Chapter 4 (pp. 67-94)

Week 5

Major Scales and Keys

Reading: Chapter 5 (pp. 95-122)

Week 6

Intervals

Reading: Chapter 6 (pp. 123-154)

Week 7

Compound Meters

Reading: Chapter 7 (pp. 155-184)

Review for Mid-term on Oct. 13

Week 8

Minor Scales and Keys

Reading: Chapter 8 (pp. 185-218)

Week 9

Modes and Other Scales

Reading: Chapter 9 (pp. 219-240)

Week 10

Introduction to Form

Reading: Chapter 10 (pp. 241-272)

Week 11

Triads

Reading: Chapter 11 (pp. 273-302)

Week 12

Chords and Symbols

Reading: Chapter 12 (pp. 303-330)

Week 13

Tonality

Reading: Chapter 13 (pp. 331-358)

Week 14

Review for Final (Mon. & Wed.) (Thanksgiving)

Week 15Review for Final (Mon. & Wed.) (Juries)
Week 16

Final Exam Monday, Dec. 8, 10:30-12:20 PM

 

 
MUTC 1131Ear Training I11131, 1132 Ear-Training I, II (1-2-0) [#] Includes the development of musical hearing through exercises and organized drill in melodic and harmonic singing (using solfege), and melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation. Must be taken concurrently with MUTC 1133, 1134, 1235 and 1236. Fall (1131) - Spring (1132)

Mr. Lawson Hager, Dean. SYLLABUS

Ear Training, MUTC 1131—Wednesday and Friday—8:00 a.m.

The development of harmonic and melodic hearing skills through organized drill, and the development of reading skills through sight-singing.  TEXT: Music for Sight Singing, 7th Ed., Robert Ottman

Ear Training Tentative Schedule (Chaps. 1-4)

Aug 27-29Intro. of Materials and E. T. Techniques
Sep 3-5Chap. 1, rhythm drill, solfege technique
Sep 10-12Chap. 1
Sep 17-21Chap. 2, tonic triad, Major triad, simple time
Sep 24-26Chap. 2, rhythm drills, melodic dictation
Oct 1-3Chap. 3, melodic major key, compound time
Oct 8-10 Chap. 3, melodic dictation, harmonic dictation
Oct 15-17Chap. 3, sight-singing, dictation
Oct 22-24Chap. 4, Minor keys, sight-singing, dictation
Oct 29-31Chap. 4, melodic and harmonic dictation, sight-singing
Nov 5-7Chap. 4, dictation, sight-singing
Nov 12-14 Chap. 4, extended dictation, new melodies
Nov 19-21 Harmonic dictation, Authentic and Plagal Cadences
Nov 28-30 Thanksgiving Holidays
Dec 3Dictation Final Exam, 8:00 a.m.
Dec 11Sight singing Final Exam, 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Grade percentages

  • Daily grade—50%--includes homework and pop test
  • Major Exams—30%
  • Final Exam—20%

Dr. Kristin Isaacson's syllabus:

Course description

The development of rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic hearing skills through  organized drill, and the development of reading skills through sight singing.

Grade percentage

30%Assignments, quizzes, participation
20%Computer lab sessions
20%Midterm Exam: Wed. October 15, 8:00 a.m. and hearings TBA
30%Final Exam:  Mon. December 8, 8:00-10:00 am

 

 
MUTC 1133Keyboard I11133, 1134 Keyboard I, II (1-1-0) [#] The practical application of harmonic materials studied in MUTC 1131, 1132, 1235 and 1236 on the keyboard. Must be taken concurrently with MUTC 1131, 1132, 1235 and 1236. Fall (1133) - Spring (1134)

Dr. Kristin Isaacson Syllabus; Tentative Schedule

Course Text

Hager, Lawson, Theory Keyboard (Course packet): It is available for purchase in the main music office.

Course Description

Practical application of harmonic materials from MUTC 1235, and MUTC 1131 applied to keyboard.

Course Goals

Learning to play (1) scales (all keys in the circle of fifths in one octave), (2) chord qualities (Major-Augmented-Minor-Diminished), (3) cadential progressions, and (4) harmonization of given melodies.

 
Thursday
1 8/28

1. Introduction; Keyboard Orientation, as needed.

2. Scales in Tetrachord Fingering in Major Keys: Hager, pp. 1, 4 & 5.

3. Circle of Keys in the order of fifths (see Week 3, Quiz).

2 9/4

1. Scales in Tetrachord Fingering in Major Keys: Hager, pp. 1, 4 & 5.

2. Scales in Tetrachord Fingering in Minor Keys: Hager, pp. 1, 4 & 5

3. Circle of Keys in the order of fifths (see Week 3, Quiz).

Quiz: Scales in Tetrachord Fingering in C, G, D, F & Bb Majors.

Hager, pp. 1, 4 & 5

3 9/11

1. Scales in Tetrachord Fingering in Major and Minor Keys: Hager, pp. 1, 4 & 5.

2. Relative and Parallel Major and Minor Keys: Hager, pp. 1, 4 & 5.

3. Five Finger Patters in Major Keys.

a. RH 1-2-3-4-5-4-3-2-1-3-5-3-1; followed by a triad.

b. LH 5-4-3-2-1-2-3-4-5-3-1-3-5; followed by a triad.

Quiz: Circle of Keys – Order of fifths

a. Verbalize order of sharp keys (C-G-D-A-E-B-F#-C#), then

flat keys (Cb-Gb-Db-Ab-Eb-Bb-F-C) in order of ascending fifths.

b. Play the order of sharp keys in single notes (LH 5-1; RH 1-5, hand over hand), in half-notes, then in quarter notes, MM = 100.

c. Play the order of flat keys in single notes (LH 5-1; RH 1-5,

hand over hand), in half-notes, then in quarter notes, MM = 100.

4 9/18

1. Intervals: Hager, pp. 6-7.

2. Five Finger Patters in Minor Keys.

a. RH 1-2-3-4-5-4-3-2-1-3-5-3-1; followed by a triad.

b. LH 5-4-3-2-1-2-3-4-5-3-1-3-5; followed by a triad.

3. Relative and Parallel Major and Minor Keys, up to 3# & 3b: Hager, pp. 1, 4 & 5.

4. Triads & Chord Qualities: Handout, p. 71; Hager p. 8.

 

Quiz: Scales in Tetrachord Fingering in A, E, D, B & G Minors.

Hager, pp. 1, 4 & 5

5 9/25

1. Chord Qualities: M-A-M-m-d Triads: Handout, p. 71; Hager p. 8.

2. Parallel Triads of the Key and Inversions in C Major: Handout, pp. 134-5; Hager p. 8.

3. Tonic and Dominant in Major Keys: Hager, pp. 10-13.

 

Quiz: Major and their Relative and Parallel Minor Scales in Tetrachord Fingering, up to 3# & 3b.

Hager, pp. 1, 4 & 5

6 10/2

1. Parallel Triads of the Key and Inversions in G & F Majors:

Handout, pp. 134-135; Hager p. 8.

2. Tonic and Dominant in Major Keys: Hager, pp. 10-13.

3. Tonic and Dominant in Minor Keys: Hager, pp. 10-13.

 

Quiz: Chord Qualities: M-A-M-m-d Triads.

Handout, p. 71

7 10/9

Review – Midterm Exam

Quiz: Parallel Triads of the Key and Inversions in G or F Major.

Handout, p. 135

8 10/16 Midterm Exam
9 10/23

1. Warm Up: Major Five Finger Patterns (see Week 4).

2. Tonic and Dominant: Hager, pp.11-13.

3. Melody Harmonization: Hager, p. 13.

4. Subdominant in Major Keys: Hager, p. 14.

10 10/30

1. Warm Up: Major Five Finger Patterns (see Week 4).

2. Subdominant in Major Keys: Hager, p. 14.

3. Subdominant in Minor Keys: Hager, p. 14.

4. I-IV-I-V7-I in Major Keys: Handout, p. 176; Hager, pp. 15-17.

 

Quiz: Melody Harmonization (Comping); LH Bass only; RH Chord.

Hager, p. 13

11 11/6

1. I-IV-I-V7-I in Major Keys: Handout, p. 176; Hager, p. 15.

2. i-iv-i-V7-i in Minor Keys: Handout, p. 176; Hager, p. 15.

3. Comping (RH blocked chord; LH bass note (root) only): Hager, p. 19.

 

Quiz: Chord Progression I-IV-I-V7-I in Major Keys, up to 3# & 3b.

Hager, pp. 16-17

12 11/13

1. I-IV-I-V7-I in Major Keys: Handout, p. 176; Hager, p. 15.

2. i-iv-i-V7-i in Minor Keys: Handout, p. 176; Hager, p. 15.

3. Melody Harmonization (RH melody; LH blocked chord): Hager, p. 19.

 

Quiz: Chord Progression i-iv-i-V7-i in Minor Keys, up to 3# & 3b.

Hager, pp. 16-17

13 11/20

1. Warm Up: I-IV-I-V7-I in C, G & F majors.

2. Melody Harmonization and Comping: Hager, pp. 18 & 20.

                                                                                   

Quiz: Hager, p. 19; (1) Comping; (2) LH Chord; RH Melody.

You are expected to be able to play in both ways
14 11/27 Thanksgiving Holiday
15 12/4 Review for Final Exam
16Final Exam-TBA
Weekly Tests 50%NO MAKE UP TESTS unless absence is due to a preapproved School of Music event. Arrangement should be made with the instructor prior to any excused absence.
Midterm Exam 20%NO MAKE UP EXAM
Final Exam 30%

 

 
MUTC 1235Harmony I21235, 1236 Harmony I, II (2-2-0) [#] A study of the basic materials of music. Also includes principles of voice leading and composition in four-part chorale style. Must be taken concurrently with MUTC 1131, 1132, 1133 and 1134. Fall (1235), Spring (1236)

Mr. Lawson Hager, Dean.  Syllabus

Harmony, MUTC 1235—Monday and Thursday—8:00 a.m.

Developing an understanding of the basic materials of music composition, principles of part-writing all triads and their inversions, harmonies, and seventh chords. TEXT: Tonal Harmony, 6th Ed., Stephan Kostka, Dorothy Payne.  Workbook for Tonal Harmony, 6th Ed., Stephan Kostka, Dorothy Payne

Harmony tentative schedule (Chapters 1-7), assignments from the workbook as given

Aug 25-28Chap. 1, Introduction, Theory Basics
Sep 1-4Chap. 1
Sep 8-11Chap. 2, Elements of Harmony
Sep 15-18Chap. 3, Triads and seventh chords
Sep 22-25Chap. 3, Exam on triad and seventh chord spellings
Sep 29-Oct 2 Chap. 4, Diatonic chords in major and minor key
Oct 6-9Chap. 5, Principles of voice leading
Oct 13-16Chap. 6, Root position part writing
Oct 20-23Chap. 6
Oct 27-30Chap. 6, Exam root position part writing
Nov 3-6Chap. 7, Harmonic progression
Nov 10-13Chap. 7
Nov 17-20Chap. 1-7, Exam-Theory Basics plus
Nov 24Chap. 1-7
Dec 1Final Review
Dec 8Harmony Final Exam, 8:00 a.m.
Harmony: Workbook assignments (tentative)

Chap. 1

              ex. 1-2   all

              ex. 1-3   all

              ex. 1-4   all

              ex. 1-5   A. – C. even #’s only

              ex. 1-6   A. odd #’s, B. all, C. even #’s, D. all, E. all

Chap. 2

              All exercises will be done in class

Chap. 3

              ex. 3-1  A. & B. in class, C. odd #’s, D. even #’s

              ex. 3-2  A. B. C. odd #’s

              ex. 3-3  A. in class, B. 1, 2, and 3  all

              ex. 3-4  in class

Chap. 4   In class

Chap. 5   In class

Chap. 6

              ex. 6-1  in class

              ex. 6-2  A. all, B. all

              ex. 6-3  A. odd #’s, B. even #’s

              ex. 6-4  A. all, B. 2 & 4, C. 1, D. 2 & 3

Chap. 7

              ex. 7-1 A-B-C. in class, D-E-F. all, G. #2, H. 1-2, I. in class, J. in class

Grade percentages

  • Daily grade—50%--includes homework and pop test
  • Major Exams—30%
  • Final Exam—20%

 

Ms. Hye-Jean Choi Syllabus

Course Description

A Study of the basic materials of music composition; principles of part-writing all triads and their inversions, harmonies, and seventh chords.

 

Her Grading policy was:

Grading Policy

Daily Grade 50%includes assignments and quizzes
Midterm Exam 20% 
Final Exam 30% 

Dr. Peter Neubert also taught 1235.  His syllabus

Course Purpose

The aim of this course is to develop a working knowledge of the basic materials of music composition from the common practice era. Students will learn to identify, analyze and write  triads and seventh chords in four parts. His grading policy was the same as Ms. Choi's

 
MUTC 1132Ear Training II1Mr. Lawson Hager, Dean.  Syllabus

Ear Training, MUTC 1132—Wednesday and Friday—8:00 a.m.

The development of harmonic and melodic hearing skills through organized drill, and the development of reading skills through sight-singing.  TEXT: Music for Sight Singing, 7th Ed., Robert Ottman

Ear Training Tentative Schedule (Chaps. 6-12)

Jan 14-16Chap. 6 and review
Jan 21-23Chap. 6
Jan 28-30 Chap. 6 (Sight-singing exam)
Feb 4-6Chap. 7
Feb 11Chap. 7 (no class Feb 13)
Feb 18-20Chap. 8 (Sight-singing exam)
Feb 25-27 Chap. 8
Mar 4-6Chap. 9
Mar 9-13Spring Break
Mar 18-20 Chap. 9
Mar 25-27 Chap. 10 and Chap. 11
Apr 1-3 Chap. 10 and Chap. 11
Apr 8-10 Chap. 12
Apr 15-17 Chap. 12
Apr 22-24 Review, Chaps. 1-12
Apr 29 Dictation Final Exam
May 7 Sight singing Final Exam

Grade percentages

  • Daily grade—50%--includes homework and pop test
  • Major Exams—30%
  • Final Exam—20%

Dr. Jeffrey Cottrell Syllabus

Course description:

The development of harmonic and melodic hearing skills through organized drill, and the development of reading skills through sight-singing. 

TEXT: Music for Sight Singing, 7th Ed., Robert Ottman.

Grade percentages

Daily grade—50%--includes homework and pop tests

Major Exams—30%

Final Exam—20%

Ear Training Tentative Schedule (Chaps. 6-12)
Jan 12, 14Chap. 6 and review
Jan 21 Chap. 6 (no class on the19th)
Jan 26, 28 Chap. 6
Feb 2, 4Chap. 7
Feb 9, 11 Chap. 7
Feb 16, 18 Chap. 8
Feb 23, 25 Chap. 8
Mar 2, 4 Chap. 9 (Sight-singing and dictation exams)
Mar 9, 11 Spring Break
Mar 16, 18 Chap. 9
Mar 23, 25 Chaps. 10 & 11
Mar 30, Apr 1 Chaps. 10 & 11
Apr 6, 8 Chap. 12 (Sight-singing and dictation exams)
Apr 13, 15 Chap. 12
Apr 20, 22 Review, Chaps. 1-12
Apr 27, 29 Review, Chaps. 1-12
May 4 8-9:50AM Dictation and Sight singing Final Exams
 
MUTC 1134Keyboard II1Dr. Jeffrey Cottrell Syllabus

Course description

The practical application of harmonic materials studied in MUTC 1131, 1132, 1235 and 1236 on the keyboard.

Text: Hager, Lawson, Theory Keyboard (available in music office).

Goals

Learning to play chord progressions, cadential patterns, figured bass, and harmonizing melodies.

GRADING

A—90-100: accurate pitches and rhythm, correct fingering, at tempo,

            no restarts.

B—80-89: one or two mistakes, mostly correct fingerings, slightly too slow,

            one restart with one or two pauses.

C—70-79: Same as grade B requirements with more pauses, even slower,

            two restarts.

D—60-69: Three restarts, plus even more pauses and tempo problems.

F—59 and below: Student no-showed, or played so badly as to prove they

            do not know the assignment at all.

Grade percentages

Daily grade—60% (includes weekly quizzes)

Midterm Exam—20%

Final Exam—20%

Tentative Schedule

Week 1

Review

Week 2

Quiz: Playing major triads and their inversions in G, F, D, and Bb. See handout.

Week 3

Quiz: progressions using 1st inversions of I, IV, & V in C major. Play

“keyboard style”; LH bass and RH chord. Use bass notes from book in LH and soprano notes in RH (Hager p. 22, #1, 2, 3, 4).

Week 4

Quiz: Progressions using 1st inversions of I, IV, V in F and G major(Hager p. 22, #1, 2, 3, 4).

Week 5

Quiz: building chords from the top note (handout).

Week 6

Quiz: progressions using 2nd inversions of I, IV, V in F or G major (Hager p.22, #6, 7, 8, 9, 10, p. 23 # 1.).

Week 7Review for midterm.
Week 8

Midterm:  by appointment during class and later in the week if necessary.

Week 9

2nd half of semester overview
Week 10Spring Break

Week 11

Quiz: Progressions using the supertonic and leading tone triads in C major and C minor (Hager p.24, #1, 2, 4, 5).

Week 12

Quiz: Progressions using the mediant and submediant triads in G or F major (Hager p. 27, #1, 2, 3).

Week 13

Quiz: Harmonization. Play given chord progressions, adding 3 upper

voices in “keyboard style.” Try to avoid parallel 5ths and 8vas between

soprano and bass (Hager p. 28, #1, 2).

Week 14

Quiz: Progressions using supertonic seventh chords in C, G and F major, C and A minor. (Hager p. 30, #1, 2, 3, 4).

Week 15,

Review for final exam

Week 16

Final Exam, Thursday May 7, 8:00 – 9:50 AM (by appointment).

Ms. Hye-Jean Choi Syllabus

GRADING POLICY

  • 50% Weekly Tests (NO MAKE UP TESTS unless absence is due to a preapproved School of Music event. Arrangement should be made with the instructor prior to any excused absence.)
  • 20% Midterm Exam (NO MAKE UP EXAM)
  • 30% Final Exam (NO MAKE UP EXAM)

Tentative Schedule

Week 1,

Jan 15

1. Semester Overview.

2. Introduction of Inversions: Hager, p. 21.

3. Progressions using the 1st Inversions of I, IV & V: Hager, p. 22.

Week 2,

Jan 22

1. Progressions using the 1st Inversions of I, IV & V: Hager, p. 22.

2. Building Chords from the Top Note: Handout, p. 315.

Quiz: Progressions using the 1st Inversions of I, IV & V in C Major.

Play in Keyboard Style (LH Bass/RH Chord): Keep the bass notes from the book in LH; Keep the soprano notes from the book and add inner notes in RH.

Hager, p. 22, #1, 2, 3 & 4

Week 3, Jan 29

1. Progressions using the 1st Inversions of I, IV & V, up to 2# & 2b:

Hager, p. 22.

2. Building Chords from the Top Note: Handout, p. 315.

3. Progressions using the 2nd Inversions of I, IV & V: Hager, pp. 22-23.

                                         

Quiz: Progressions using the 1st Inversions of I, IV & V in F or G Major.

Hager, p. 22, #1, 2, 3 & 4

Week 4, Feb 5

1. Building Chords from the Top Note: Handout, p. 315.

2. Progressions using the 2nd Inversions of I, IV & V: Hager, pp. 22-23.

3. Keyboard Harmonization “Self Test”: Hager, p. 23.

 

Quiz: Building Chords from the Top Note.

Handout, p. 315

Week 5, Feb 12

1. Progressions using the 2nd Inversions of I, IV & V up to 2# & 2b:

Hager, pp. 22-23.

2. Keyboard Harmonization “Self Test”: Hager, p. 23.

Quiz: Progressions using the 2nd Inversions of I, IV & V in F and G Major.

Hager, p. 22, #6, 7 & 8

Week 6, Feb 19

1. Progressions using the 2nd Inversions of I, IV & V up to 2# & 2b:

Hager, pp. 22-23.

2. Keyboard Harmonization “Self Test”: Hager, p. 23.

3. Progressions for Midterm Exam up to 3# & 3b.

 

Quiz: Progressions using the 2nd Inversions of I, IV & V in F and G Major.

Hager, p. 22, #9 & 10; p. 23, #1

Week 7, Feb 26

Review for Midterm Exam

Quiz: Progressions using the 2nd Inversions of i, iv & V in A Minor.

Hager, p. 22, #5 & 11; p. 23, # 2

Week 8, Mar 5 Midterm Exam

Week 9,

Mar 12

Spring Break
Week 10, Mar 19

1. The Second Half of the Semester Overview.

2. Progressions using the Supertonic Triad: Hager, pp. 24-25.

Week 11,

Mar 26

1. Progressions using the Supertonic Triad: Hager, pp. 24-25.

2. Progressions using the Mediant and Submediant Triads: Hager, pp.

26-27.

3. Keyboard Harmonization “Test Your Skill”: Hager, p. 28.

 

Quiz: Progressions using the Supertonic Triad in C Major.

Hager, p. 24, #1, 2, 4, 5 & 6

Week 12,

Apr 2

1. Keyboard Harmonization “Test Your Skill”: Hager, p. 28.

2. Progressions using the Supertonic Seventh Chord: Hager, pp. 29-30.

3. Progressions using the Supertonic Seventh Chord in Minor Keys:

    Hager, p. 30.

4. Progressions using the Dominant Seventh Chord: Hager, p. 31. 

    

Quiz: Progressions using the Mediant and Submediant Triads

in G or F Major.

Hager, p. 27, #1, 2 & 3

Week 13,

Apr 9

1. Progressions using the Supertonic Seventh Chord up to 2# & 2b:

Hager, pp. 29-30.

2. Progressions using the Supertonic Seventh Chord in Minor Keys:

Hager, p. 30.

3. Keyboard Harmonization “Test Your Skill”: Hager, p. 31.

 

Quiz: Keyboard Harmonization “Test Your Skill”

Play the given chord progressions adding three upper voices in keyboard style (LH bass/RH chord). You may label the chords with roman numerals. Try to avoid parallel 5ths and 8ves between soprano and bass.

Hager, p. 28, #1 & 2

Week 14,

Apr 16

1. Progressions using the Supertonic Seventh Chord in Minor Keys:

Hager, p. 30.

2. Keyboard Harmonization “Test Your Skill”: Hager, p. 31.

 

Quiz: Progressions using the Supertonic Seventh Chords

in C Major and G or F Major.

Hager, p. 30, #1, 2, 3 & 4

Week 15,

Apr 23

Review for Final Exam

                                         

Quiz: Progression using Seventh Chords in C and G Majors.

Hager, p. 31, #5 (I-IV6-I6/4-ii6/5-V7-I)

Week 16,

Apr 30

Review for Final Exam

Week 17,

TBA

Final Exam

 

 

 
MUTC 1236Harmony II2

This information was provided from Instructor: Mr. Lawson Hager, Dean. 

Harmony, MUTC 1236—Monday and Thursday—8:00 a.m.

Developing an understanding of the basic materials of music composition, principles of part-writing all triads and their inversions, harmonies, and seventh chords. TEXT: Tonal Harmony, 6th Ed., Stephan Kostka, Dorothy Payne.  Workbook for Tonal Harmony, 6th Ed., Stephan Kostka, Dorothy Payne

Harmony tentative schedule (Chapters 8-15), assignments from the workbook as given

Jan 12-15 Review, Chap. 7
Jan 22 Chaps. 8, 9
Jan 26-29 Chaps. 8, 9
Feb 2-5 Chaps. 8, 9
Feb 9-12 Chap. 10
Feb 16-19 Chaps. 11, 12
Feb 23-26 Chaps. 11, 12
Mar 2-5 Chaps. 11, 12
Mar 9-13 SPRING BREAK
Mar 16-19 Chap.13
Mar 23-26 Chap. 14
Mar 30-Apr 2 Chap. 15
Apr 6-9 Chap. 15
Apr 13-16 Chaps. 1-15, Review
Apr 20-23 Chaps. 1-15, Review
Apr 27 Chaps. 1-15, Review, term project due
May 4 Harmony Final Exam, 8:00 a.m.

Grade percentages

  • Daily grade—50%--includes homework and pop test
  • Major Exams—30%
  • Final Exam—20%
 
MUTC 2131Ear Training III12131, 2132 Ear-Training III, IV (1-2-0) [#] A continuation of 1131 and 1132. Correlated with the materials studied in 2235 and 2236. Includes the study of chromaticism and an introduction to contemporary art music. Must be taken concurrently with MUTC 2133, 2134, 2235, and 2236. Fall (2131) - Spring (2132)  

Dr. Bernard Scherr Syllabus

Course Overview

This course is an extension of sophomore theory in that the presentation of topics is coordinated with the harmony and keyboard courses and focuses on sight singing and dictation.

Course Objectives:

Students will develop skills in sight singing, exercises for which will include melodies, duets, singing while playing, and themes and variations.  In addition, they will develop skills in rhythmic, harmonic and melodic dictation.  The course will incorporate various elements, which will include secondary dominant chords, secondary diminished seventh chords, mode mixture and common chord modulation.

Course Materials

A New Approach to Sight Singing by Berkowitz, Fontrier, and Kraft, 4th Edition

Course Packet for MUTC 2131/2132—Ear Training III/IV by Dr. Bernard Scherr

            (This packet is available in the Music Office. The cost is $5.)

Expectations

Practicing: Each student is responsible for practicing the musical exercises.  Much of this course is based on class participation.  A lack of proper preparation will adversely affect your grade as well as cause embarrassment in front of classmates.  You will not be simply passed over in class because you are not prepared.

Lab Work: Each student will be encouraged to use Auralia in the lab for approximately 30 minutes per week.  Auralia is an excellent aid for practicing ear training.  Please use the login sheet when using Auralia.

Grading Policy

Attendance10%# of total classes/abscences
Exam #120%Dictation and Singing: Week 4
Exam #225%Dictation and Singing: Week 8
Exam #320%Dictation and Singing: Week 12
Exam #425%Dictation and Singing: Finals Week
Total
100% 

Singing: Accuracy in pitch and rhythm is paramount, but dynamics and momentum are also considered.

Dictation: Like singing, accuracy in pitch and rhythm is paramount, but notational clarity is also required.

Class Meetings

Students are required to bring all course materials to each class meeting.  Mondays will be dedicated to singing while Thursdays will be reserved for dictation.

Exam Procedures

Singing: Students will sign up for an individual appointment for this portion of each exam.  There will be two groups of six prepared selections; students will sing one selection from each group.

Dictation: Students will be asked to dictate rhythmic lines, melodies, and chord progressions using Roman numerals.  They might also be asked to identify mistakes in a played example based on a printed selection.

Tentative Schedule

WeeksTopic-SingingTopic-Dictation
1-4Functional Chromaticism

Secondary Dominant Chords-1st and 2nd Position

16th-note divisions- 2 bars; 4 bar melodies

1:1 two-part melodies

5-8Modulation to Closely Related Keys

Secondary Dominant Chords-3rd and 4th Position; Secondary Leading Tone Chords-1st Position

16th-note divisions- 4 bars; 6 bar melodies

2:1 two-part melodies

9-12Mode Mixture

Mode Mixture and Secondary Chords

Syncopation-8th-note level; 8 bar melodies

3:1 two-part melodies

13-16Continuance of previous topics

Neapolitan 6 and Secondary Chords

Syncopation-16th-note level; 8 bar melodies

3:1 two-part melodies

 

 
MUTC 2133Keyboard III12133, 2134 Keyboard III, IV (1-1-0) [#] Practical application of harmonic materials studied in MUTC 2131, 2132, 2235, and 2236. Includes some transposition. Must be taken concurrently with MUTC 2131, 2132, 2235, and 2236. Fall (2133) - Spring (2134)  

Dr. Bernard Scherr Syllabus

Course Overview

This course will help you develop keyboard harmony skills. These skills are developed through (1) scales, (2) chord progressions, (3) realization of figured bass, and (4) harmonization of chorale melodies.

Course Objectives:

Playing scales (up to four flats and/or sharps in two octaves), cadential patterns (authentic, imperfect, and plagal), chord progressions, suspensions, and seventh chords.

Course Materials

Course Packet, compiled and edited by Dr. Bernard Scherr

            (This packet is available in the Music Office. The cost is $5.)

Grading Policy

Weekly Tests 50%
Midterm Exam20%
Final Exam30%
Total
100%

Expectations

Attendance: Each student is responsible for punctual attendance of all class meetings.

Practicing: Each student is required to practice all assignments until learned.

Class Meetings

Each class meeting you are required to bring your course packet. Each meeting consists of a test on the previous week's material, a review of previous material as needed, and the introduction of new material.

Exam Procedures

Students must be ready to test the assigned material at the beginning of class. Once called upon, students must perform or earn a failing grade (50). If a student misses a class and has not notified the instructor beforehand, he/she can make up the test the following week for a maximum score of 60. If the instructor is notified beforehand, and the absence is due to an HSU approved event, the student can make up the test for full credit; if the absence is due to illness, a maximum score of 70 can be earned (unless the student has a doctor’s note, then full credit is possible).

Tentative Schedule

Week
Wednesday 8:00-8:50
1Scales: the major sharp keys in two octaves 
Progressions: I-IV-I and I-V-I in all 3 positions and in sharp keys (including minor)
2Scales: the major flat keys in two octaves
Progressions: I-IV-I and I-V-I in all 3 positions and in flat keys (including minor)
Cadences-Morris, Chapter 1: (in sharp keys) Perfect 1-3; Imperfect 1-3; and Plagal 1-3
3Scales: the minor sharp keys in two octaves
Progressions: I-IV-V-I in all 3 positions and in sharp keys (including minor)
Cadences-Morris, Chapter 1: (in flat keys) Perfect 1-3; Imperfect 1-3; and Plagal 1-3
4

Scales: the minor flat keys in two octaves

Progressions: I-IV-V-I in all 3 positions and in flat keys (including minor)
Sequences-Morris, Chapter 1: 1-2 in sharp keys

5Progressions: I-VI-IV-V-I in sharp keys (including minor)
Sequences-Morris, Chapter 1: 1-2 in flat keys
6

Progressions: I-VI-IV-V-I in flat keys (including minor)
Cadences-Morris, Chapter 2: (in sharp keys) Perfect 1-3; Imperfect 1-3; and Plagal 1-3

Sequences-Morris, Chapter 2: 1-2 in sharp keys

7

Cadences-Morris, Chapter 2: (in flat keys) Perfect 1-3; Imperfect 1-3; and Plagal 1-3

Sequences-Morris, Chapter 2: 1-2 in flat keys

8Catchup Day and Midterm assigned and reviewed
9Midterm
10

Cadences-Morris, Chapter 3: (in sharp keys) Perfect 1-3; Imperfect 1-3; and Plagal 1-3

Sequences-Morris, Chapter 3: 1-2 in sharp keys

11

Cadences-Morris, Chapter 3: (in flat keys) Perfect 1-3; Imperfect 1-3; and Plagal 1-3

Sequences-Morris, Chapter 3: 1-2 in flat keys

12

Cadences-Morris, Chapter 4: (in sharp keys) Perfect 1-3; Imperfect 1-3; and Plagal 1-3

Sequences-Morris, Chapter 4: 1-2 in sharp keys

13

Cadences-Morris, Chapter 4: (in flat keys) Perfect 1-3; Imperfect 1-3; and Plagal 1-3

Sequences-Morris, Chapter 4: 1-2 in flat keys

14Catchup Day
15Catchup Day and Final assigned and reviewed
16Cumulative Final Exam-Wednesday of finals week, 3-5pm in room 208.

Dr. Clell Wright also teaches this, but he uses Dr. Scherr's syllabus

 
MUTC 2235Harmony III22235, 2236 Harmony III, IV (2-2-0) [#] A continuation of 1235 and 1236. The study of chromatic harmony from secondary chords to 12-tone music. Also includes basic composition, writing a musical analysis paper, and an introduction to post-tonal analysis. Must be taken concurrently with MUTC 2131, 2132, 2133, and 2134. Fall (2235) - Spring (22

Dr. Bernard Scherr syllabus

Course Overview

The purpose of this course is to help you gain an understanding of and fluency with chromaticism in music. At the center of chromaticism is the magnetism of the half-step. This force is most clearly seen in the V7 chord: ti-do and fa-mi. The minor second in harmony and melody forms the basis of all the concepts in this course. For instance, secondary dominants, mode mixture, the Neapolitan chord, augmented sixth chords, and modulation are all based on chromatically altered, diatonic pitches that exploit half-step magnetism. The expressive meaning of chromatic harmony and melody will be demonstrated in the wide variety of music that we will study in this course. In fact, atonal music (to be studied in the Spring)-a principle characteristic of 20th-century music-developed, in part, through an extended exploration of half-step magnetism.

Course Objectives:

Elements: Secondary Dominants, Secondary Diminished Seventh Chords, Mode Mixture, the Neapolitan Chord, Augmented Sixth Chords, and Modulation.
Skills: visual and aural identification, identification of examples in the literature, basic composition and scoring, and discussion of context and function.

Course Materials

Stefan Kostka and Dorothy Payne, Tonal Harmony, 6th ed. (textbook with CD)
Stefan Kostka and Dorothy Payne, Tonal Harmony, 6th ed. (workbook with CD)
Blank sheet music, pencil and eraser.

Expectations

Reading: Each student is responsible for reading the assigned pages and listening to the musical examples.
Workbook: Each student is responsible for completing the assigned tasks. These are due at the next class meeting. Late work will be marked off between 10% and 50%.
Project: Each student will compose a short piano piece. It will consist of several phrases that use the various concepts covered in class.

Grading Policy

Attendance10%# of total classes/abscences
Midterm Exam 20%Weeks 1-7
Final Exam 25%Cumlative
Assignments 45%(20% piano sonata project-25% assignments)
Total
100% 

Class Meetings

Each class meeting you will be required to bring all of your course materials. Each meeting will consist of a listening example, a lecture presentation, an in-class assignment, and a question and answer session. Graded assignments will be assigned and explained in class or via e-mail.

Exam Procedures

Listening: Each student must identify the composition (or genre), likely composer, and type of chromaticism from a musical example studied in class.
Part writing: Each student must realize a figured bass in four-parts.
Score Analysis: Each student must analyze a given score(s) by identifying the listed chords and possibly discussing the context of each chord.

Tentative Schedule

Weeks
Tuesday
Friday
1Course Introduction and Introduction to Secondary Dominant Function

Secondary Dominant Function

2Secondary Dominant FunctionSecondary Dominant Function
3Secondary Leading-tone FunctionSecondary Leading-tone Function
4Secondary Leading-tone FunctionSecondary Leading-tone Function
5Common Chord ModulationCommon Chord Modulation
6Common Chord Modulation

Mode Mixture/Borrowed Chords

Begin Project Task #1

7Mode Mixture/Borrowed Chords Mode Mixture/Borrowed Chords
8

Midterm Exam Review

Midterm Exam
9Neapolitan ChordNeapolitan Chord
10Neapolitan ChordNeapolitan Chord
11Augmented 6th ChordsAugmented 6th Chords
12Augmented 6th ChordsBegin Project Task #3
13Augmented 6th ChordsThanksgiving Holiday
14Augmented 6th ChordsBegin Project Task #4
15Final/Project ReviewSenior Comprehensive Exams
16Final Exam, Thursday, December 11, 2008, 8-10 am. Project Due

Go to Assignment and Listening Lists

 
MUTC 2132Ear Training IV1Dr. Bernard Scherr syllabus

Course Overview

This course is an extension of sophomore theory in that the presentation of topics is coordinated with the harmony and keyboard courses and focuses on sight singing and dictation.

Course Objectives:

Students will develop skills in sight singing, exercises for which will include melodies, duets, singing while playing, and themes and variations.  In addition, they will develop skills in rhythmic, harmonic and melodic dictation.  The course will incorporate various elements, which will include augmented 6 chords, modulation, post-tonal music, and mixed meters.

Course Materials

A New Approach to Sight Singing by Berkowitz, Fontrier, and Kraft, 4th Edition

Course Packet for MUTC 2131/2132—Ear Training III/IV by Dr. Bernard Scherr

            (This packet is available in the Music Office. The cost is $5.)

Expectations

Practicing: Each student is responsible for practicing the musical exercises.  Much of this course is based on class participation.  A lack of proper preparation will adversely affect your grade as well as cause embarrassment in front of classmates.  You will not be simply passed over in class because you are not prepared.

Dictation Partner/Groups: At the beginning of the semester, students will be encouraged to divide into small groups of 2-3 people. In this way, you will be able to work on dictation exercises and practice your keyboard skills.

Lab Work: Each student will be encouraged to use Auralia in the lab for approximately 30 minutes per week.  Auralia is an excellent aid for practicing ear training.  Please use the login sheet when using Auralia.

Grading Policy

Attendance10%# of total classes/abscences
Exam #120%Dictation and Singing: Week 4
Exam #225%Dictation and Singing: Week 8
Exam #320%Dictation and Singing: Week 12
Exam #425%Dictation and Singing: Finals Week
Total
100% 

Singing: Accuracy in pitch and rhythm is paramount, but dynamics and momentum are also considered.

Dictation: Like singing, accuracy in pitch and rhythm is paramount, but notational clarity is also required.

Class Meetings

Students are required to bring all course materials to each class meeting.  Mondays will be dedicated to singing while Thursdays will be reserved for dictation.

Exam Procedures

Singing: Students will sign up for an individual appointment for this portion of each exam.  There will be two groups of six prepared selections; students will sing one selection from each group.

Dictation: Students will be asked to dictate rhythmic lines, melodies, and chord progressions using Roman numerals.  They might also be asked to identify mistakes in a played example based on a printed selection.

Tentative Schedule

WeeksTopic-SingingTopic-Dictation
1-4Chromaticism

Modulation to V and vi in major and III in minor;

triplets and syncopation - 4 bars; 8 bar melodies;

4:1 two-part melodies

5-8Modulation to closely related keys

Modulation to IV in major and VI in minor;

assymetrical meters - 4 bars; 8 bar melodies;

4:1 two-part melodies

9-12Continuance of previous topics

Augmented 6 chords; assymetrical meters; 8 bar melodies; 4:1 two-part melodies

13-16Modes

Augmented 6 chords; modes and extra-tertian harmony; assymetrical meters; 8 bar melodies;

4:1 two-part melodies

Go to Singing List

 

 
MUTC 2134Keyboard IV1Dr. Bernard Scherr Syllabus

Course Overview

This course is a continuation of Keyboard III. In this course you will develop your keyboard harmony skills through (1) cadential progressions, (2) harmonic sequences, (3) realization of figured bass, and (4) harmonization of chorale melodies.

Course Objectives:

Learning to play cadential patterns (authentic, imperfect, and plagal), sequences, suspensions, seventh chords, and harmonizing melodies

Course Materials

Course Packet, compiled and edited by Dr. Bernard Scherr

            (This packet is available in the Music Office. The cost is $5.)

Grading Policy

Weekly Tests 50%
Midterm Exam20%
Final Exam30%
Total
100%

Expectations

Attendance: Each student is responsible for punctual attendance of all class meetings.

Practicing: Each student is required to practice all assignments until learned.

Class Meetings

Each class meeting you are required to bring your course packet. Each meeting consists of a test on the previous week's material, a review of previous material as needed, and the introduction of new material.

Exam Procedures

Students must be ready to test the assigned material at the beginning of class. Once called upon, students must perform or earn a failing grade (50). If a student misses a class and has not notified the instructor beforehand, he/she can make up the test the following week for a maximum score of 60. If the instructor is notified beforehand, and the absence is due to an HSU approved event, the student can make up the test for full credit; if the absence is due to illness, a maximum score of 70 can be earned (unless the student has a doctor’s note, then full credit is possible).

Final Exam Procedures

Each student will sign up for a ten-minute individual appointment during the final exam time. He or she will be asked to play a cadence, sequence, and create a chorale harmonization at sight.

Tentative Schedule

Week
Wednesday 8:00-8:50
1Cadences: Morris, Chapter 5: (in sharp keys) 
Sequences: Morris, Chapter 5: (in sharp keys) 
Harmonization: "Christus, der ist mein Leben"
Modulation: to the dominant
2

Test Week 1 material

Cadences: Morris, Chapter 5: (in flat keys) 
Sequences: Morris, Chapter 5: (in flat keys)
Harmonization: "Christus, der ist mein Leben"
Modulation: to the dominant

3

Test Week 2  material

Cadences: Morris, Chapter 6: (in sharp keys) 
Sequences: Morris, Chapter 6: (in sharp keys)
Harmonization: "Nun lob', mein Seel', den Herren"
Modulation: to the subdominant

4

Test Week 3 material

Cadences: Morris, Chapter 6: (in flat keys) 
Sequences: Morris, Chapter 6: (in flat keys)
Harmonization: "Nun lob', mein Seel', den Herren"
Modulation: to the subdominant

5

Test Week 4 material

Cadences: Morris, Chapter 7: (in sharp keys) 
Sequences: Morris, Chapter 7: (in sharp keys)
Harmonization: "Herzlich tut mich verlangen"
Modulation: to the submediant

6

Test Week 5 material

Cadences: Morris, Chapter 7: (in flat keys) 
Sequences: Morris, Chapter 7: (in flat keys)
Harmonization: "Herzlich tut mich verlangen"
Modulation: to the submediant

7

Test Week 6 material

Midterm material assigned and reviewed

8Midterm: Weeks 1-6 material
9Cadences: Morris, Chapter 8: (in sharp keys) 
Exercise: Morris, Chapter 8
Harmonization: "Nun danket alle Gott"
Modulation: to the mediant
10

Test Week 9 material

Cadences: Morris, Chapter 8: (in flat keys) 
Exercise: Morris, Chapter 8
Harmonization: "Nun danket alle Gott"
Modulation: to the mediant

11

Test Week 10 material

Harmonization: "Erschienen ist der herrliche Tag"
Modulation: to the supertonic in major and the subtonic in minor

12

Test Week 11 material

Harmonization: "Erschienen ist der herrliche Tag"
Modulation: to the supertonic in major and the subtonic in minor

13

Test Week 12 material

Harmonization: "Vater unser im Himmelreich"
Modulation: using mode mixture and augmented 6 chords

14

Test Week 13 material

Harmonization: "Vater unser im Himmelreich"
Modulation: using mode mixture and augmented 6 chords

15

Test Week 14 material

Final assigned and reviewed

16Cumulative Final Exam-Wednesday, May 6, 2009, 3-5pm in room 208.

Dr. Clell Wright uses Dr. Scherr's syllabus

 
MUTC 2236Harmony IV2Dr. Bernard Scherr Syllabus

Course Overview

The chromatic principals that we explored in the fall will continue to form the basis of all the concepts in this course. In fact, the continued development of chromaticism in music during the 19th-century eventually leads to the abandonment of common practice tonality. This situation, however, did not eliminate tonal elements from music; on the contrary, the vast majority of 20th-century music contains a number of tonal elements, albeit in altered forms. You will explore these forms and others, in addition to learning several new analytical methods.

Course Objectives:

Elements to study: Modulation, Altered Dominant Chords, Late 19th-century Counterpoint, Sequence, Expanded Tonality, Chords as Colors, Modality, Altered Scales, Parallelism, New Chord Structures, Pandiatonicism, New Avenues in Rhythm and Meter, Set-Theory, Serialism, Change Music, and Expanded Textures.
Skills to learn: visual and aural identification, identification of examples in the literature, and basic composition and scoring.

Course Materials

Stefan Kostka and Dorothy Payne, Tonal Harmony, 5th ed. (text, workbook, and tapes)
Charles Burkhart, Anthology for Musical Analysis, 6th ed. (optional)
Blank sheet music, pencil and eraser

Expectations

Reading: Each student is responsible for reading the assigned pages and listening to the musical examples.
Workbook: Each student is responsible for completing the assigned tasks. These are due at the next class meeting. Late work will be marked off between 10% and 50% or may not even be accepted if it is deemed too late.
Project: Each student will compose a short piece for an instrumental group yet to be determined. It must be 1 minute long and use a post-tonal concept covered in class.

Grading Policy

Attendance10%# of total classes/abscences
Assignments 35% 
Composition 10% 
Midterm Exam 20%Weeks 1-7
Final Exam 25%Cumlative
Total
100% 

Class Meetings

Each class meeting you will be required to bring all of your course materials. Each meeting will consist of listening examples, a lecture, an in-class assignment, and a question and answer session. Graded assignments will be assigned and explained in class or via Blackboard.

Exam Procedures

Listening: Each student must identify the type of composition, likely composer, and the type of chromaticism in question, or identify the type of chords used in a given passage. 
Part writing: Each student must complete the given chorale melody or bass line, or must score a given progression in four-parts.
Score Analysis: Each student must analyze the given score(s) by identifying the underlined chords and giving any information requested. The order of the examples will follow the order of presentation in class.

Tentative Schedule

Weeks
Tuesday
Friday
1Course Introduction
Modulation: Altered Chords, Sequential, and Common-tone. Unusual uses of +6 chords.

Modulation: Monophonic, Direct and Mode Mixture. Unusual uses of +6 chords.

2Enharmonic Spelling and Modulation with V7 Enharmonic Modulation with o7
3Altered V Chords 9th, 11th, and 13th Chords
4Common-tone o7 Simultaneities and Coloristic Chord Successions
5Counterpoint in 19th-century Treatment of Dominant Harmony and Sequence
6Expanded Tonality In Class Analysis of Chopin and Mahler excerpts
7Introduction to the 20th Century
Impressionism and Scales
Chord Structure
8Midterm Review Midterm
9

Parallelism

Pandiatonicism

10Rhythm and Meter Set Theory
11Set Theory Set Theory
12Set Theory Set Theory
1312-tone Technique 12-tone Technique
14Total Serialism Chance Music and Expanded Textures
15Electronic Music Sophomore Comprehensive Theory Exam: 8-8:50 a.m.
16Final Exam, Thursday, May 7, 2009, 8-10 am. Project Due

 

 
MUTC 2338Computers in Music32338 Computers in Music (3-3-0) This course is an introduction to the use of computers for declared music majors who are preparing for professional music careers. This course satisfies the University General Education Technological Competency requirement.

Note:  this is a required class and is listed as a theory course

 
MUTC 3231Form & Analysis23231 Form and Analysis (2-3-0) A study of form in music from motives and phrases to large-scale musical organization. Also includes writing a musical analysis paper. Fall. Prerequisite: First and second year music theory sequence and successful completion of Sophomore Comprehensive Exam

Dr. Bernard Scherr Syllabus

Course Overview

In this course we will explore musical form through detailed score study and listening. This exploration will entail learning a six-step method of analysis and writing an analysis paper. The purpose of this activity is to help you gain a thorough understanding of musical structures.

Course Materials

Douglas Green, Form in Tonal Music, 2nd ed.
Charles Burkhart, Anthology for Musical Analysis, 6th ed. This book must be new: no used books will be accepted.
Blank sheet music, pencil and eraser

Expectations

Reading: Each student is responsible for reading the assigned pages and listening to the musical examples.
Assignments: Each student is responsible for completing the assignments. Graded assignments will be given in class. The due dates of these assignments will be given by the instructor in class. Late work will be marked off between 10% and 50%. The instructor reserves the right to not accept assignments that are extremely late (several weeks after the due date).
Paper: Each student will write a 6-8 page analysis paper.

Grading Policy

Attendance10%# of total classes/abscences
Midterm Exam 20%Weeks 1-7
Final Exam 25%Cumlative
Assignments 45%(20% analysis paper-25% assignments)
Total
100% 

Class Meetings

Each class meeting you will be required to bring all of your course materials. Each meeting will consist of a listening example, a lecture presentation, in-class analysis, and a question and answer session. Assignments will be explained in class or on Blackboard.

Exam Procedures

The mid-term and final exams will include a section on the definition of terms, identifying musical form in listening examples, and score analysis.

Tentative Schedule

Week
Monday
Wednesday
Friday
1Course Introduction: Form, Shape, and Genre Harmonic Structure of the Phrase Harmonic Structure of the Phrase
2Melodic Structure of the Phrase Melodic Structure of the Phrase Melodic Structure of the Phrase
3Development of the Phrase Development of the Phrase Development of the Phrase
4Phrases in Combination Phrases in Combination Phrases in Combination
5Small Forms Small Forms Small Forms
6Theme and Variation Theme and Variation Theme and Variation
7Ternary Form Ternary Form Ternary Form
8Paper Assignment and Mid-Term ReviewMid-Term ExamFall Break-No Class
9Rondo Rondo Rondo
10Binary Form Binary Form Binary Form
11Sonata Form Sonata Form Sonata Form
12Sonata Form Sonata Form Sonata Form
13Concerto Form Concerto Form Concerto Form
14Fugal Designs Thanksgiving Holiday-No Class
15Fugal DesignsSophomore/Senior Comprehensive Exams-No Class
16Cumulative Final Exam-TBA
The paper is Wednesday at noon.

 

 
MUTC 4231Orchestration I24231 Orchestration I (2-2-0) An exploration of the characteristics of band and orchestral instruments through score study. Emphasis is placed on idiomatic writing and knowledge of the timber of each instrument and combinations of instruments, and how these sounds are applied in symphonic scoring. Also includes scoring for various orchestral and band groups, with some emphasis on instruments with voices. There will be some performance in class or studio. Prerequisite: Sophomore Comprehensive and/or consent of instructor. Fall

Dr. Charles Coltman Syllabus

Course Structure

This course is intended as an introduction to the orchestral instruments, and as such, will focus primarily on basic information (e.g., instrumental ranges, score setups, transposition, special terminology, etc.), as well as some score study.  Reading assignments will be given from the text, and there will be several short orchestration projects throughout the semester.  Visiting performers will be in class on a regular basis to discuss and demonstrate their respective instruments.

There will be four examinations (one on each of three sections: strings, woodwinds, brass) and a final comprehensive exam which emphasizes the material from the last section (percussion and harp).  These exams will cover basic information such as ranges, instrumental characteristics, and terminology, and will include several brief listening identifications.  The final project consists of a short arrangement for orchestra of a pre-existing piano work, to be assigned during the twelfth week of classes.

Course Materials

Samuel Adler, The Study of Orchestration, 3rd Ed. and workbook.

Grading Policy

Final grades will be based upon the regular assignments, exams, final project,

and attendance/class participation, distributed as follows:

Assignments

25%

Exam 1

10%

Exam 210%
Exam 310%

Exam 4 (final)

15%

Final Project 20%

Attendance/Participation

10%

Expectations

Assignments are expected to be turned in on time. Late assignments will not be accepted. If there are extenuating circumstances come see me. (Illness, death in the family, etc)

IMPORTANT DATES

Thurs., Dec. 4: Final Project Due

Thursday Dec. 11 8:00 - 9:50: Final Exam

Schedule of Topics

DayDateTopic
Tuesday8/26Introduction
Thursday8/28

Instruments of the orchestra; score & part setup                Reading: Chapters 1-2 (pp. 1-50)

Tuesday9/2

Bowed String Instruments: violin, viola

Reading: Chapter 3 (pp. 51-75)

Thursday9/4

Bowed String Instruments: violoncello, contrabass

Reading: Chapter 3 (pp. 75-88)

Tuesday9/9

Scoring for strings

Reading: Chapter 5 (pp. 111-163)

Thursday9/11Review
Tuesday9/16

Exam 1: bowed string instruments

Thursday9/18

Transpositions/clefs, articulation, the woodwind section of

the orch., etc.

Reading: Chapter 6 (pp. 164-179)

Tuesday9/23

Woodwind instruments: flutes, clarinets, saxophones

Reading: Chapter 7 (pp. 180-193; 205-221)

Thursday9/25

Woodwind instruments: oboes, bassoons

Reading: Chapter 7 (pp. 194-204; 221-228)

Tuesday9/31

Scoring for woodwinds

Reading: Chapter 8 (pp. 229-294)

Thursday10/2

Review

Tuesday10/7Exam 2: Woodwind Instruments
Thursday10/9

Intro to Brass Instruments

Reading: Chapter 9 (pp. 295-311)

Tuesday10/14

Brass instruments: horn, trumpets

Reading: Chapter 10 (pp.312-340)

Thursday10/16

Brass instruments: trombones, tubas

Reading: Chapter 10 (pp. 241-356)

Tuesday10/21

Scoring for brass

Reading; Chapter 11(pp. 357-430)

Thursday10/23Review
Tuesday10/28

Exam 3: brass instruments

Thursday10/30

Percussion Instruments

Reading: Chapter 12 (pp. 431-467)

Tuesday11/4

Percussion Instruments

Thursday11/6

Miscellaneous instruments: harp, piano, etc.

Reading: Chapter 4 (pp. 89-110), Chapter 13 (pp. 468-485)

Tuesday11/11

Final project assignments

Scoring for Percussion

Reading: Chapter 14 (486-544)

Thursday11/13

Harp Demonstration

Scoring for Orchestra I

Reading: Chapter 15 (pp. 459-509)

Tuesday11/18

Scoring for Orchestra II

Reading: Chapter 15 (pp. 459-509)

Thursday11/25

Review & discussion of final projects

Tuesday11/27

Review & discussion of final projects

Thursday12/2Review for Final
Tuesday12/4Final projects due!
Thursday12/118:00 - 9:50: Final Exam

 

 
 Total20Counted keyboard since it seems to be integrated, but not the computer course 

Howard Payne University

http://www.hputx.edu/s/668/howardpayne.aspx?pgid=1065

http://www.hputx.edu/s/668/howardpayne.aspx?sid=668&gid=1&pgid=1067

http://www.hputx.edu/s/668/howardpayne.aspx?sid=668&gid=1&pgid=1071

Req theory course

Title

Credit hours

Description

 
MUS 1413Musicianship I4MUSIC 1413. MUSICIANSHIP I. An introductory course in the basic written and aural materials of music. Fall. Prerequisite: Placement examination. Four semester hours

COURSE SYLLABUS

 

 

I. Course Information

 

A.        Title: Musicianship I

Course Number: MUS 1413

Semester: Fall, 2006

Class Meets: 11:00 to 11: 50 a.m. M-F in DMC 302 and the Music Computer Lab

 

B.         Required Texts:

Kostka, Stefan, and Payne, Dorothy. Tonal Harmony, 5th Edition. McGraw-Hill, 2004.

___Workbook for Tonal Harmony.

Horvit, Michael, et al. Music for Ear Training. Schirmer, 2001

Ottman, Robert W. Music for Sight Singing, 5th Edition. Prentice-Hall, 2001.

 

C.                 Instructor: Dr. Allen Reed      

            Office: DMC 409       

            Telephone: Ext. 5521 

            Office Hours: Posted on door            

 

II. Purpose/Objectives/Assessment

 

A.        The purpose of Music 1413 is to provide essential knowledge of the grammar of music – music theory and aural skills – for students pursuing a music career as a performer or teacher. The course fulfills the program objective of “preparing students for careers in the fields of music performance, public school and/or private music teaching, and church music ministry.

 

B.         The objectives of Music 1413 are to enable students who successfully complete the    course requirements to:

 

1. Demonstrate familiarity with rhythmic concepts, scales, key signatures,    intervals, and chord construction.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Class discussions, written assignments, tests]

 


 

2. Demonstrate the ability to utilize the Music Computer Lab to complete    corollary computer assignments.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Successful completion of computer lab assignments]

 

3. Display a practical and theoretical grasp of various elements of music.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Class participation, written assignments, tests]

 

5. Display ability to read and notate music.

 

[ASSESSMENT: written assignments, sight singing, tests]

 

 

III. Methods and Procedures

 

A.        There are no prerequisites for enrolling in Music 1413. Students who may be unprepared by background and/or previous experience for the class will take a placement examination to determine if taking Music 1301, Fundamentals of Music, would be advisable prior to enrolling in Music 1413.

 

B.         Specific material to be covered includes Parts I and II from the text.  Dates are given in the class schedule at the beginning of the semester.

 

1. Scales, modes

2. Harmonic progression

4. Specific diatonic chords

5. Inversions

6. Nonharmonic tones

7. 7th Chords

8. Part-writing

9. Analysis

 

 

C.         Teaching methodology will include lecture, demonstration, guided class discussion,             class drill, and Music Computer Lab experience.

 

D.        In addition to class time, students enrolled in Music 1413 will be assigned written homework from the required texts and drills in the Music Computer Lab. This will provide additional practice and reinforcement of material covered in class.

 

E.        For additional assistance in Music 1413, the Instructor’s office hours are posted       on his office door. An appointment would be appreciated.

 

F.         Class Policies

 

1.       Homework or reading should be done BEFORE class and will be the basis of class discussions.

 

2.   No late work will be accepted. If a student is ill, a 0 will be recorded, and this grade will be deleted when the student presents a written doctor’s excuse. (It will count neither for nor against the student.)

 

3.      No food or drinks (including water) are allowed in class. Please do not bring these into the classroom.

 

4.      No leaving class (except for personal emergency) until class is dismissed.

 

 

 

 

IV. Grading System

 

A.                 The final grade for Music 1413 will be determined from the average of

 

1.      Written Mid-term Exam – 20%

2.      Written Final Exam – 20%

3.      Homework – 20%

4.      Sight-Singing Average (Scheduled and Pop Quizzes)– 20%

5.      Dictation Average (Scheduled and Pop Quizzes) – 20%

 

Further Considerations:

 

1.    If Computer Lab assignments are not completed, final grade will be reduced by one letter grade.

 

2.      Students must achieve at least a 60% average on sight singing and a 60% average on dictation to pass the course.

 

3.      ATTENDANCE POLICY (See below under IV.C.)

                                   

B.         The grading scale for Music 1413 will be

 

A

90-100

B

80-89

C

70-79

D

60-69

 

On work where a letter grade is assigned, the following table will apply

 

Letter

Grade

Errors

Numerical Grade

A

0

95

A-

1

92

B+

2

88

B

3

85

B-

4

82

C+

5

78

C

6

75

C-

7

72

D+

8

68

D

9

65

D-

10

62

F

11

50

F*

NA

0

 

*Assignment, quiz, or exam missed due to unexcused absence.

 

 

C.         Attendance: Students must attend seventy‑five percent of class periods to receive credit for the course. This class meets 71 days fall semester; a student will automatically fail on the 18th absence.

 

There is no distinction between excused and unexcused absences for this attendance requirement.

 

ATTENDANCE POLICY

 

Regular attendance will ensure students’ success in class.  Therefore, the following attendance policy will be enforced this semester:

 

0-3 Absences will not affect the final grade.

4-8 Absences will lower the final grade by one letter.

9-12 Absences will lower the final grade by two letters.

13-17 Absences will lower the final grade by three letters.

18 or more absences will cause the student to fail the course.

 

Whether or not the absence is excused has no bearing on this policy. If a student has a concern about the policy, he/she may discuss it with the professor.

                                                                                                           

 

D.        There are no requirements regarding keeping exams and papers.

 

 

V. Bibliography

 

Aldwell, Edward, and Schachter, Carl. Harmony and Voice Leading, 2nd Edition. San Diego: Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich, 1989.

 

Benjamin Thomas, Horvit, Michael, and Nelson, Robert. Techniques and Materials of Tonal Music, 3rd Ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1985.


 

Benjamin, Thomas, Horvit, Michael, and Nelson, Robert. Music for Analysis, 2nd Ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984.

 

Benward, Bruce, and White, Gary. Music in Theory and Practice, 4th Ed. Dubuque, IA: Wm. C. Brown Publishers, 1989.

 

Burkhart, Charles. Anthology for Musical Analysis, 4th Ed. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1985.

 

Christ, William et al. Materials and Structure of Music, 3rd Ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice‑Hall, Inc., 1980.

 

Forte, Allen. Tonal Harmony in Concept and Practice, 3rd Ed. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1979.

 

Lester, Joel. Analytic Approach to Twentieth Century Music. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1989.

 

McHose, Allen I. The Contrapuntal Harmonic Technique of the 18th Century. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice‑Hall, Inc., 1947.

 

Mohn, Michael. Preparing Traditional Music Manuscript,  2nd Ed. Fairfield, CA: M. Mohn  Publishing, 1990.

 

Warfield, Gerald. How to Write Music Manuscript. New York: Schirmer Books, 1977.

 

 
MUS 1414Musicianship II4MUSIC 1414. MUSICIANSHIP II. A study of the diatonic harmonic practices of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Includes written and aural exercises in analysis, harmonization, and composition in common practice style. Spring. Prerequisite: Music 1413 with a grade of “C” or better. Four semester hours.

COURSE SYLLABUS

 

 

I. Course Information

 

A.        Title: Musicianship II

Course Number: MUS 1414

Semester: Spring, 2007

Class Meets: 8:00 to 8: 50 a.m. M-F in DMC 302 and the Music Computer Lab

 

B.         Required Texts:

Kostka, Stefan, and Payne, Dorothy. Tonal Harmony, 5th Edition. McGraw-Hill, 2004.

___Workbook for Tonal Harmony.

Horvit, Michael, et al. Music for Ear Training. Schirmer, 2001

Ottman, Robert W. Music for Sight Singing, 5th Edition. Prentice-Hall, 2001.

 

C.                 Instructor: Dr. Allen Reed      

            Office: DMC 201       

            Telephone: 5521        

            Office Hours: Posted on door            

 

II. Purpose/Objectives/Assessment

 

A.        The purpose of Music 1414 is to provide essential knowledge of the grammar of music – music theory and aural skills – for students pursuing a music career as a performer or teacher. The course fulfills the program objective

 

B.         The objectives of Music 1414 are to enable students who successfully complete the    course requirements to:

 

1. Demonstrate familiarity with rhythmic concepts, scales, key signatures,    intervals, and chord construction.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Class discussions, written assignments, tests]

 


 

2. Demonstrate the ability to utilize the Music Computer Lab to complete    corollary computer assignments.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Successful completion of computer lab assignments]

 

3. Display a practical and theoretical grasp of various elements of music.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Class participation, written assignments, tests]

 

5. Display ability to read and notate music.

 

[ASSESSMENT: written assignments, sight singing, tests]

 

 

III. Methods and Procedures

 

A.        There are no prerequisites for enrolling in Music 1414.

 

B.         Specific material to be covered will be found in Chapters 7 – 16 of the required text, and includes the following topics. Dates for exams and quizzes are given in the class schedule at the beginning of the semester.

 

1. Harmonic Progression

2. Part-writing

3. Analysis

4. Figured bass

5. Triads in inversion

6. Nonharmonic tones

7. 7th Chords

8. Elementary musical form

9. Secondary triads

 

C.         Teaching methodology will include lecture, demonstration, guided class discussion,             class drill, and Music Computer Lab experience.

 

D.        In addition to class time, students enrolled in Music 1414 will be assigned written homework from the required texts and drills in the Music Computer Lab. This will provide additional practice and reinforcement of material covered in class.

 

E.        For additional assistance in Music 1414, the Instructor’s office hours are posted      on his office door. An appointment would be appreciated.


 

 

F.         Class Policies

 

1.       Homework or reading should be done BEFORE class and will be the basis of class discussions.

 

2.   No late work will be accepted. If a student is ill, a 0 will be recorded, and this grade will be deleted when the student presents a written doctor’s excuse. (It will count neither for nor against the student.)

 

IV. Grading System

 

A.                 The final grade for Music 1414 will be determined from the average of

 

1.      Written Mid-term Exam – 20%

2.      Written Final Exam – 20%

3.      Homework – 20%

4.      Sight-Singing Average – 20%

5.      Dictation Average  – 20%

 

Further Considerations:

 

1.    If Computer Lab assignments are not completed, final grade will be reduced by one letter grade.

 

2.      Students must achieve at least a 60% average on sight singing and a 60% average on dictation to pass the course.

 

3.      ATTENDANCE POLICY (See below under IV.C.)

                                   

B.         The grading scale for Music 1414 will be

 

A

90-100

B

80-89

C

70-79

D

60-69

 

On work where a letter grade is assigned, the following table will apply

 

Letter

Grade

Errors

Numerical Grade

A

0

95

A-

1

92

B+

2

88

B

3

85

B-

4

82

C+

5

78

C

6

75

C-

7

72

D+

8

68

D

9

65

D-

10

62

F

11

50

F*

NA

0

 

*Assignment, quiz, or exam missed due to unexcused absence.

 

C.         Attendance: Regular attendance will ensure students’ success in class.  Therefore, the following attendance policy will be enforced this semester:

 

0-3 Absences will not affect the final grade.

4-8 Absences will lower the final grade by one letter.

9-12 Absences will lower the final grade by two letters.

13-16 Absences will lower the final grade by three letters.

17 or more absences will cause the student to fail the course.

 

Excused absences (determined by the professor) will be taken into account in enforcing this attendance policy. If a student has a concern about the policy, he/she may discuss it with the professor.

                                                                                                           

D.        There are no requirements regarding keeping exams and papers.

 

 

V. Bibliography

 

Aldwell, Edward, and Schachter, Carl. Harmony and Voice Leading, 2nd Edition. San Diego: Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich, 1989.

 

Benjamin Thomas, Horvit, Michael, and Nelson, Robert. Techniques and Materials of Tonal Music, 3rd Ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1985.


 

Benjamin, Thomas, Horvit, Michael, and Nelson, Robert. Music for Analysis, 2nd Ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1984.

 

Benward, Bruce, and White, Gary. Music in Theory and Practice, 4th Ed. Dubuque, IA: Wm. C. Brown Publishers, 1989.

 

Burkhart, Charles. Anthology for Musical Analysis, 4th Ed. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1985.

 

Christ, William et al. Materials and Structure of Music, 3rd Ed. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice‑Hall, Inc., 1980.

 

Forte, Allen. Tonal Harmony in Concept and Practice, 3rd Ed. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1979.

 

Lester, Joel. Analytic Approach to Twentieth Century Music. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1989.

 

McHose, Allen I. The Contrapuntal Harmonic Technique of the 18th Century. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice‑Hall, Inc., 1947.

 

Mohn, Michael. Preparing Traditional Music Manuscript,  2nd Ed. Fairfield, CA: M. Mohn  Publishing, 1990.

 

Warfield, Gerald. How to Write Music Manuscript. New York: Schirmer Books, 1977.

 

 
MUS 2413Musicianship III4MUSIC 2413. MUSICIANSHIP III. A continuation of Musicianship II concentrating on the chromatic materials of common practice and romantic periods. Includes written and aural exercises in analysis, harmonization, and composition in the appropriate style. Fall. Prerequisite: Music 1414 with a grade of “C” or better. Four semester hours

MUSICIANSHIP 3

 MUS2413-01

FALL 2006

bb1.hputx.edu

 

 

Instructor: Patricia Banks

DMC104

pbanks@hputx.edu

(325) 649-8504

See Personal Information on Blackboard for Office Hours

 

 

Please read this syllabus carefully. It outlines exactly what will be expected of you in this course, which concepts will be included in tests, and how your grade will be determined.

 

Assessment of the effectiveness of this course will be made through a jury examination at the close of the semester, question #5 on the SET, the "Exit Survey" given to graduating music majors, and alumni survey questions regarding course work at HPU and its relevance to their chosen career

 

Assessment of student achievement of stated goals will be made through class assignments, class quizzes, music computer lab assignments, and two examinations.

 

Textbooks:

Kostka-Payne: TONAL HARMONY, 5th edition.  McGraw-Hill.2004

                         Textbook and set of 2 CD's to accompany text.

                         Workbook with accompanying CD

Ottman: Music for Sight Singing, 6th edition Prentice-Hall, 2004.

Horvit/Koozin/Nelson: Music for Ear Training, CD-ROM & Workbook. 2nd edition.

   Thomson/Schirmer, 2005.

Computer Media:

  Blank Computer Media: 3.5 disks,  CD-RW, Flash Drive at least 256MB

Other materials:

  Staff paper and PENCILS

 

  1. Mus2413 is the third in a four-semester sequence of courses which introduce music students to the theoretical concepts of the Common Practice Period. The fourth semester also introduces some concepts of 20th Century theory. HPU music majors are required to complete all four semesters with a grade of "C" or better.

  2. . All students enrolled in MUS2413 must also be enrolled in MUS0171-0074, Music Computer Lab 1-4. Much of the ear training associated with this course will be accomplished in the Music Computer Lab


 

 

 

  1. The PURPOSE of MUS2413 is to continue equipping students to analyze and understand the music which they perform, as well as to understand the basic rules of music composition. Students will be introduced to Non-Diatonic Harmony in this second year of theory.

 

4. The OBJECTIVES of MUS2413 are to master the following concepts:

 

 

a. Chromaticism and Altered Chords

b. Secondary Functions

c. Secondary Dominant Chords

d. Secondary Leading-Tone Chords

e. Modulation and Change of Key

f. Tonicization

g. Key Relationships

h. Common-Chord Modulation

i. Sequential Modulation

j. Modulation by Common Tone

k. Monophonic Modulation

l. Direct Modulation

m. Formal Terminology

n. Binary and Ternary Forms

o. 12-Bar Blues, and other Formal Designs

p. Mode Mixture

q. Borrowed Chords in Minor and Major

r. Modulations involving Mode Mixture

 

 

1. Teaching methodology will include lecture, demonstration, guided class discussion, class drill, group practice, and self-paced work in the Music Computer Lab, DMC109

 

2. Grading System

a. Assignments and test dates for this semester will be posted on Blackboard. It is the student's responsibility to check Blackboard carefully, EVERY DAY,  and to be prepared for tests.

b. The final grade for the semester will be determined by averaging the grades for the following

 (1) Assignment average 30%

 (2) Mid-Term exam 15%

 (3) Final exam 25%

 (4) Music Computer Lab assignments 30%


 

 

 

 

3. Grading Scale for MUS2413

90-100 = A

80--89 = B

70--79 = C

60--69 = D

below 60 = F

 

4. The final grade in MUS2413 will be determined by a student's performance on two examinations, quizzes, class assignments, and computer lab grades and assignment completion.

5. Three absences are allowed during the semester, but NOT encouraged. The fourth absence will reduce the semester average by one letter grade. Each subsequent absence will reduce the semester average by one letter grade. Absences exceeding 25% of class time will result in failure of the course, as mandated by the HPU catalogue

 

6. Students are required to keep all MUS2413 materials in a three ring binder which is brought to each class session.

 

7. Any student may be dismissed from class for disruptive conduct or inappropriate dress. A student who is discovered cheating or who plagiarizes will be dismissed from the course and will receive a failing grade (F) for MUS2413.

 

 
MUS 2414Musicianship IV4MUSIC 2414. MUSICIANSHIP IV. A written and aural study of the techniques found in Impressionism through current practices with an emphasis on major

MUSICIANSHIP 4

 MUS2414-01

SPRING 2007

BB2.hputx.edu

Instructor: Patricia Banks

DMC104

pbanks@hputx.edu

(325) 649-8504

Office Hours are posted on Blackboard, (See Personal Information) and outside DMC104.

 

Please read this syllabus carefully. It outlines exactly what will be expected of you in this course, which concepts will be included in tests, and how your grade will be determined.


Assessment of the effectiveness of this course will be made through a jury examination at the close of the semester, question #5 on the SET, the "Exit Survey" given to graduating music majors, and alumni survey questions regarding course work at HPU and its relevance to their chosen career.


Assessment of student achievement of stated goals will be made through class assignments, class quizzes, music computer lab assignments, and two examinations.

TEXTBOOKS:
Kostka-Payne: TONAL HARMONY, 5th edition
Textbook and set of 2 CD's to accompany text.
Workbook with accompanying CD


Ottman:
Music for Sight Singing, 6th edition

Horvit/Koozin/Nelson: Music for Ear Training CD-ROM and Workbook


Staff paper and PENCILS

 

 

COURSE GOALS:

 

1. Mus2414 is the fourth in a four-semester sequence of courses which introduce music students to the theoretical concepts of the Common Practice Period. This fourth semester also introduces some concepts of 20th Century theory. HPU music majors are required to complete all four semesters with a grade of "C" or better.

 


2. All students enrolled in MUS2414 must also be enrolled in MUS0171-0074, Music Computer Lab 1-4. Much of the ear training associated with this course will be accomplished in the Music Computer Lab.

 


3. The PURPOSE of MUS2414 is to continue equipping students to analyze and understand the music which they perform, as well as to understand the basic rules of music composition. Students will be introduced to Non-Diatonic Harmony in this second year of theory.

 


4. The
OBJECTIVES of MUS2414


By the end of the semester, students will demonstrate, through the use of original compositions, a thorough understanding of the following theoretical concepts:



Augmented Sixth Chords


Enharmonic Spellings and Modulations

 


Further Elements of the Harmonic Vocabulary

 


Tonal Harmony in the Late 19th Century

 


An Introduction to 20th Century Practices


(1)Impresionism


(2)Scales


(3)Chord Structure


(4)Parallelism


(5)Pandiatonicism


(6)Rhythm and Meter


(7)Set Theory


(8)The Twelve-Tone Technique


(9)Total Serialization


(10)Aleatory or Chance Music


(11)Texture and Expanded Instrumental Resources


(12)Electronic Music


 

 

 

COURSE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 


1. Teaching methodology will include lecture, demonstration, guided class discussion, class drill, group practice, and self-paced work in the Music Computer Lab, DMC109.

 


2. Grading System:

 


a. Assignments and test dates dates for this semester will be posted on this site. It is the student's responsibility to check carefully, and to be prepared for tests.

 


b. The final grade for the semester will be determined by averaging  the grades for the following:

 


(1) Assignment and Quiz average (30 %)

 


(2) Mid-Term exam  (20%)

 


(3) Final exam (25%)

 


(4) Music Computer Lab assignments  (25%)

 


3.Grading Scale for MUS2414:

 


90-100 = A

 


80-89 = B

 


70-79 = C

 


60-69 = D

 


below 60 = F

 


4. The final grade in MUS2414 will be determined by a student's performance on two examinations/compositions, quizzes, class assignments, and computer lab grades and assignment completion.

 


5. Three absences are allowed during the semester, but NOT encouraged. The fourth absence will reduce the semester average by one letter grade. Each subsequent absence will reduce the semester average by one letter grade. Absences exceeding 25% of class time will result in failure of the course, as mandated by the HPU catalogue.

 


6. Students are required to keep all MUS2414 materials in a three ring binder which is brought to each class session.

 


7. Any student may be dismissed from class for disruptive conduct or inappropriate dress. A student who is discovered cheating or who plagiarizes will be dismissed from the course and will receive a failing grade (F) for MUS2414.

 

 

 
MUS 4213Form and Analysis2MUSIC 4213. FORM AND ANALYSIS A study of the structure of music; motif and phrase, lied, rondo, variation, sonata and programmatic forms. Fall. Prerequisite: Music 2414. Two semester hours

COURSE SYLLABUS

 

 

I. Course Information

 

A.        Title: Form and Analysis

Course Number: MUS 4213

Semester: Fall, 2008

Class Meets: 1:00 to 1: 50 p.m. MW in DMC 408 and the Music Computer Lab

 

B.         Required Texts:

Spencer, Peter, and Temko, Peter. A Practical Approach to the Study of Form in Music.

 

Burkhardt, Charles, and Rothstein, William. Anthology for Musical Analysis, 6th Ed.

 

C.                 Instructor: Dr. Allen Reed      

            Office: DMC 409       

            Telephone: 5521        

            Office Hours: Posted on door            

 

II. Purpose/Objectives/Assessment

 

A.         Music 4213 is an upper level theory course which introduces students to the formal designs of music of the Common Practice Period.  The purpose of the course is to fulfill the program objective of helping students develop an understanding of the theoretical fundamentals of how music synthesizes melody, harmony, and rhythm. The course is required of all students with a major in music.

 

B.         The objectives of Music 4213 are to enable students who successfully complete the    course requirements to:

 

1. Be able to identify the basic factors in form, e.g., rhythm, melody, harmony, and tonality.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Class discussions, written assignments, tests]

 


 

2. Recognize small structural elements of music, such as phrases, phrase groupings.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Class discussions, written assignments, tests]

 

3. Display an understanding of part forms, rondo, variation forms.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Class discussions, written assignments, tests]

 

4. Be able to identify the compositional devices in contrapuntal music.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Class discussions, written assignments, tests]

 

            5. Analyze the sections of sonata form and multi-movement forms.

 

[ASSESSMENT: Class discussions, written assignments, tests]

 

           

 

III. Methods and Procedures

 

A.        Successful completion of MUS 2214/2234 is required for enrolling in Music 4213.

 

B.         Specific material to be covered includes topics listed in IIB, above. Dates are given in         the class schedule at the beginning of the semester.

 

C.         Teaching methodology will include lecture, demonstration, guided class discussion,             class drill, and Music Computer Lab experience.

 

D.        For additional assistance in Music 4213, the Instructor’s office hours are posted      on his office door. An appointment would be appreciated.


 

 

E.        Class Policies

 

1.       Homework or reading should be done BEFORE class and will be the basis of class discussions.

 

      All homework, exercises, written exams, and quizzes must be completed in PENCIL.

 

2.   No late work will be accepted. If a student is ill, a 0 will be recorded, and this grade will be deleted when the student presents a written doctor’s excuse. (It will count neither for nor against the student.)

 

3.      No leaving class (except for personal emergency) until class is dismissed.

 

IV. Grading System

 

A.                 The final grade for Music 4213 will be determined from the average of

 

1.      Homework Assignments – 25%

2.      Mid-term Exam – 25%

3.      Analysis Project – 25%

4.      Final Exam – 25%

 

2.      If a student has more than 3 unexcused absences, the final grade for the course will be lowered by one letter grade. (See below under IV.C.)

                                   

B.         The grading scale for Music 4213 will be

 

A

90-100

B

80-89

C

70-79

D

60-69

 

On work where a letter grade is assigned, the following table will apply

 

Letter

Grade

Errors

Numerical Grade

A

0

95

A-

1

92

B+

2

88

B

3

85

B-

4

82

C+

5

78

C

6

75

C-

7

72

D+

8

68

D

9

65

D-

10

62

F

11

50

F*

NA

0

 

*Assignment, quiz, or exam missed due to unexcused absence.

 

 

C.         Attendance: Students must attend seventy-five percent of class periods to receive credit for the course. This class meets 29 days fall semester; a student will automatically fail on the 8th absence.

 

There is no distinction between excused and unexcused absences for this attendance requirement. A student will be counted absent if textbooks and materials are not brought to class or if the student sleeps during part or all of the class.

 

If a student has more three unexcused absences, the grade for the course will be reduced by one letter. A written excuse must be presented for an absence to be considered, and whether or not the absence is excused will be determined by the instructor.

 

D.        There are no requirements regarding keeping exams and papers.

 

 

 

 
MUS 3233

or MUS 4253

Choral Arranging

Orchestration

2MUSIC 3233. CHORAL ARRANGING. A practical course in arranging for various combinations of voices and practice in writing piano accompaniments in both the traditional and contemporary styles. Fall, even years. Prerequisite: Music 2414. Two semester hours
MUSIC 4253. ORCHESTRATION. A study of the principles of orchestration. The course is designed also for original productiveness in the instrumental areas of composition. Spring, even years. Prerequisite: Music 2414. Two semester hours
[Note:  Depending upon choral or instrumental]

Music 3233, Music 4253—Choral Arranging/Orchestration

 

Instructor:  Dr. Robert Tucker

Office: DMC 201  649-8600

Office hours:  MWF—8:00-9:00 a.m. or by appointment

 

Text: No required text for this class

 

Course Description:

 

Music 3233, 4253 is designed as a choral arranging/orchestration course for music majors.  The course is a comprehensive course that synthesizes previous knowledge of music theory and vocal performance.  The students will learn the material through lecture, discussion, tests, and assignments.

 

This course satisfies the music education requirement for teacher certification as well as the Bachelor of Music, Church Music, and the Bachelor of Arts.  The class is designed for music majors and substitutes for orchestration.

 

Outcomes:  the student successfully completing Music 3233 should:

1.      Understand the basic techniques of successful choral arranging and orchestration

2.      Should know and understand transposition of instruments

3.      Demonstrate a technical knowledge of music theory

4.      Demonstrate adequate skills at Finale 2007 or 2008.

3.   Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of vocal performance, arranging, and orchestration skills

 

Requirements:

1.      Take a midterm and a final examination

2.      Turn in 6 assignments and 1 final project

3.      Participate actively in discussions and questions

4.      BE ON TIME and PREPARED, NEVER MISS CLASS

 

Evaluation Procedures:

 

The grading scale is a ten-point scale.

 

20%--midterm

20%--final exam

15%--participation including attendance and promptness

35%--periodic assignments

10%--final project

 

Assessment: The course will be assessed through grades and skills gained. Alumni follow-up is done periodically to insure the students are prepared for graduate school or market demand.

 

 
   MUSIC 1301. FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC. An introductory course in the principles of music reading, writing of scales, intervals, correlation of meter and rhythmic patterns, sight reading, ear training, keyboard techniques and elementary conducting. Required of students unprepared to enter Music 1213. Credit will not apply on music major course of study for graduation. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: None. Three semester hours

[Note that MUSIC 1213 is not listed in any of their courses - perhaps they renumbered it to 1413, but it is still obviously a remedial course]

 
 Total20  
     
     
     
     

Lamar University

http://dept.lamar.edu/cofac/deptmusic/

http://www.lamar.edu/pdfs/FineArtsAndComm.pdf

http://www.lamar.edu/pdfs/FineArtsAndComm.pdf

Req theory course

Title

Credit hours

Description

 
MUTY 1311 3

1311, 1312 Theory I, II Elementary Harmony 3:5:0

Elementary keyboard and written harmony, sight singing; ear training.

Prerequisite: MUTY 1370 or by advanced standing exam.

 
 
MUTY 1312 3  
MUTY 2311 3

2311, 2312 Theory III, IV Advanced Harmony 3:5:0

Advanced keyboard and written harmony; sight singing; ear training.

Prerequisite: MUTY 1312.

 
 
MUTY 2312 3  
MUTY 4420 2

4220 Orchestration 2:2:0

Techniques of writing and arranging for orchestral instruments in small combinations and for full orchestra.

Prerequisite: MUTY 2312.

 
 
MUTY 4210 2

4210 Form and Analysis 2:2:0

Analytical study of musical forms and styles.

Prerequisite: MUTY 2312.

 
 
MUSI 2377 3

Computers in Music 3:3:0

An overview of computer technology as related to the field of music. Includes study in technological developments

and software applicable to the student’s area of specialization.

 

[Computer course required, but not listed as a theory course]

 
   

1370 Elements of Music 3:3:0

Designed to prepare students for advanced study in music theory. A study of scales, chords, musical terminology,

key signatures, sight-singing, musical notation and the harmonic, melodic and rhythmic structure of music.

 
 
     
  16not counting the computer course 
     
     

Midwestern State University

http://finearts.mwsu.edu/music/

http://www.msumusic.org/degrees.html

http://www.msumusic.org/catalog.html

Req theory course

Title

Credit hours

Description

MUSC 1601/1603 Music Theory I
MUSC 1611/1613 Music Theory II
MUSC 2603 Music Theory III
MUSC 2613 Music Theory IV
MUSC 3662 Orchestration
MUSC 3632 Analysis of Musical Form

 
MUSC 1601 1MUSC 1601.  Elementary Sight-Singing and Ear Training.  Singing in treble and bass clefs with introduction to alto clef, major, and minor modes.  Recognition of intervals and triads and melodic dictation.  Enrollment limited to students who are enrolled in or have completed MUSC 1603 
  3MUSC 1603.  Theory I.  Part writing of figured bass exercises and melody harmonizations using triads.  Composing on a small scale will be introduced.  MUSC 1601 should be taken concurrently 
  1MUSC 1611.  Elementary Sight-Singing and Ear Training.  Prerequisite:  MUSC 1601.  A continuation of MUSC 1601.  Enrollment limited to students who are enrolled in or have completed MUSC 1613 
  3MUSC 1613.  Theory II.  Prerequisite:  MUSC 1603.  A continuation of MUSC 1603.  MUSC 1611 should be taken concurrently 
  3MUSC 2603.  Theory III.  Prerequisite:  MUSC 1613.  Sight-singing more difficult melodies.  Dictation of more advanced melodies.  Introduction of two-part and four-part dictation.  Part-writing of figured basses and melodies using altered chords, modulations, 9th, 11th, and 13th chords.  Students will also have the opportunity to freely compose several short works in various styles using some of the more advanced chords as they are studied 
  3MUSC 2613.  Theory IV.  Prerequisite:  MUC 2603.  A continuation of MUSC 2603 
  2MUSC 3662.  Orchestration.  Prerequisite:  MUSC 2613.  Techniques of scoring and part extraction for orchestra.  Special consideration to aspects of school and church ensembles.  Problems involving combinations of instrumental groups with other media.  As part of the final projects, students will orchestrate an original composition of 16-24 measures in length.  The original will be in a keyboard style of the student's choosing with the approval of the instructor 
  2MUSC 3632.  Analysis of Musical Form.  Analysis of musical structure including simple binary and ternary forms, the rondo and sonata-allegro forms, and contrapuntal applications